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Year/ Make Model Registration# Chassis# Auctioneer Date Guide Price Sale Price
JEFF HARRIS: This BSA has a maroon frame and guards with a silver tank and comes with its original buff logbook and according to the vendor it runs well. It is a lovely original bike with ‘barn find’ looks but can be ridden. We would suggest that a full inspection is undertaken prior to riding on the road however. 1953 BSA C11 250cc 861 XVB BC10544891 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £1,144
JEFF HARRIS: In the previous family ownership for approximately thirty years An older restoration that was completed to a high standard and well maintained since Scarce right-hand-drive example A highly usable and luxuriously fitted 1920’s motorcar By the end of the 1920s, Packard had arguably become the last word in American automotive fashion outselling rival Cadillac by three to one. Responsible for lifting Packard out of the post-WW1 depression, the 'Six' range was current between 1921 and 1928. Engineered to the same exacting standards as its larger brethren, the newcomer was based around a beautifully wrought ladder-frame chassis equipped with leaf-sprung suspension and four-wheel drum brakes. Powered by a 4-Litre (later 4.7-Litre) straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission, the 'Six' could be had with a range of elegant factory coachwork. Though, with the plentiful power and torque on tap from its famously durable L-head powerplant, it also boasted a surprising turn of speed. The 1923 example of the Packard Six on offer here is fitted with the 4.0-liter straight-six engine mated to a four-speed manual transmission. An older restored example which was completed to a high standard, ‘DS 8058’ has been well maintained since, both throughout the previous long-term family ownership (from 1989 to 2019) and during the subsequent ownership of the vendor. Luxuriously appointed, the cabin features Red leather upholstery upfront and Red velour cloth to the rear plus a six-person drinks cabinet and cigar hatches. Accompanied by period marketing literature, copies of the service manual and a current V5C document, this handsome and scarce right-hand drive example of the Packard Six is a highly useable entry into 1920’s motoring! 1923 Packard Six Sedan DS 8058 441615R H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

JEFF HARRIS: Comprehensively restored in America prior to be imported to the UK during 2020 Nicely detailed with an original Boyce Motometer and authentic wind deflectors Said to run 'very well' An integral part of General Motors' burgeoning empire during the 1920s, Buick was widely famed for the advanced engineering and durability of its products. Boosted by a series of high-profile exploits including the first automotive expedition to Afghanistan (1923), victory in the Leningrad-to-Moscow endurance trials (1925), assorted African hill-climb wins, a tug of war with an elephant and patronage from the Sultan of Johore, the marque celebrated sale number 2,000,000 in 1926. Introduced two years before then, Buick’s Series 24 models could be had with a choice of four-cylinder or six-cylinder engines. The former sat on a 109-inch wheelbase and were powered by a 170 cu in (2.8 litre) four-cylinder OHV unit allied to three-speed manual transmission. Three times as expensive as a Ford Model T, the Series 24 four-cylinder cars boasted such niceties as detachable cylinder head and four-wheel drum brakes. Finished in Dark Green with Black upholstery, ‘BF 9349’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good’ condition with regard to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Said to have been comprehensively restored in America before being imported to the UK last year, the Buick sports an original Boyce Motometer and authentic wind deflectors. 1924 Buick Series 24 Tourer BF 9349 1075732 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £14,000 - £18,000

1924 Talbot 8/18 hp Tourer XO 3518 15365 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: Subject to a previous engine overhaul by Brunts of Silverdale Current ownership since 1988 Offered with chassis card records, invoices and collection of old MOT's Fitted with Park Ward coachwork Used in the 1960’s by a Dr Welch who used GMJ41 to visit his patients Believed to have been damaged by shrapnel from a WW2 air raid and then fitted with military-grade front screen glass Unveiled in 1922, the 20HP was a second string to the Rolls-Royce bow - a shorter, more economical sibling to the Silver Ghost which broadened the marque’s reach to span both the very rich and seriously wealthy. Instantly distinguished by its horizontal radiator shutters, the newcomer was constructed around a ladder-frame chassis of 129 inch wheelbase. Power came from a 3,127cc straight-six, OHV monobloc engine mated to a three-speed manual gearbox. Suspension was by semi-elliptic leaf springs all-round. Braking was initially on the rear wheels alone, while steering was by worm and nut. Progressively updated to feature a four-speed gearbox and servo-assisted all-wheel braking, the ‘baby’ Rolls remained in production until 1929, by when some 2,885 examples had vacated the company’s Derby factory. Lighter and more responsive than the Silver Ghost, the 20HP was capable of exceeding 60mph. Finished in Yellow over Black with a Tan leather upholstery chassis GUJ16 was supplied new to Mrs L.J Stretton of Nottingham with Park ward coachwork which it still retains today. Sold by Mrs Stretton at the end of World War Two chassis GUJ16 is understood to have passed to the Montagu Arms to convey guests to the local station and then used in the 1960’s by a Dr Welch to visit his patients and remained with him until being acquired by the current vendor in 1988. Subject to a previous engine overhaul by renowned Brunt’s of Silverdale and fitted with overdrive ‘TO4800’ is offered with its chassis card records, a collection of invoices which include marque specialist Royce services and a collection of old MoT certificates. Said to have always been stored in a central heated garage the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission and bodywork as ‘Very Good’ and the electrical equipment, interior trim, and paintwork all as ‘Good’. 1926 Rolls-Royce 20hp Saloon TO 4800 GMJ 41 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £30,000 - £35,000

JEFF HARRIS: Dates from 1927 - the final year of Model T production Fitted with a desirable sporting 'Runabout' body Various late-model options including the bright plated radiator shell and wire wheels (shod with balloon tyres) A well known vehicle to viewers of children's television 1927 marked an end of an era for Ford Motor Company as it would be the final production year of the Model T. These "Improved Ford" models were introduced in the final years of the T and gave an advanced look at what was to come for the company's new Model A. As such, restyled bodywork and even chassis improvements make these later cars standouts of the T range. This original Model T 'Runabout' Tourer has been in the current ownership for three years having been imported from the USA in 2013. Evidently the subject of much previous restoration work, the red paintwork compliments the black interior and makes a welcome change from the usual black finished bodies more commonly found. The car is offered with a folder full of paperwork and photographs, most recently being put to use for occasional television work. Benefiting from a simple folding fabric hood to help fend off the worst of the English weather, 'BF 6434' is said to have good body, engine, electrical equipment and interior, whilst the paintwork is rated 'average'. 1927 Ford Model T 'Runabout' BF 6434 C611200 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £13,000 - £15,000

JEFF HARRIS: Rebodied as a four-seat open tourer A rare survivor Current ownership since 2015 In 2011 a previous owner with a hankering for an 18/80 MG set about creating the next best thing for himself and acquired a Morris Six rolling chassis to use as the basis for its restoration and rebody in the form of a four-seat open tourer along the lines of its MG sibling. In 2015 with the works in the final stages he was able to reunite the car with its original registration TY 4950 having obtained a copy of the original paperwork from the family of a past owner which is included in the sale. Constructed to a good standard, the mechanicals were all thoroughly overhauled and the body constructed in fabric-covered ash and aluminium whilst the interior is trimmed in red leather. This is an attractive vintage tourer which has clearly had much care and attention expended in its creation, the body being of particularly pleasing proportions with accurate lines and louvres. VSCC eligibility can only enhance its appeal. The first commercially successful six-cylinder Morris, the ‘Six’ had an OHC engine of 2468cc designed by Frank Woollard and Arthur Pendrell. This engine was and is a highly regarded power unit, the basic concept living on in an improved chassis frame as the MG 18/80 Mark 1. 1928 Morris Six Tourer TY 4950 1433 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: The only Sunshine Coupe known to have survived of the nine thought to have been made Understood to have had just two keepers prior to entering the current family ownership in 2018 A rare and elegant Vintage Doctor's Coupe This appealing 15hp ‘Sunshine Coupe’ is believed to be one of only nine examples built and the only one of these still surviving. Its Salmons Tickford coachwork originally offered space for three sitting abreast up front although the car now sports two non-standard bucket seats for driver and passenger whilst the rear is converted for extra luggage space. A period suitcase adorns the boot. Aside from the amended seating the car features nickel headlamp surrounds (not chrome) and a nearside side-mounted spare wheel carrier. Originally UK registered in December 1930, it was resident in Germany for several years where it was restored in the 2000s at huge cost – we are advised some £200,000 was invested in the works and there are numerous bills contained within the large history file together with a book of photographs. Re-imported to the UK in 2018 it has been used sparingly since but is described as being on the button. Offered with Swansea V5c and various original handbooks and sales literature in addition to the copious invoices mentioned above, this unique Doctor’s Coupe is worthy of close inspection. Powered by a 1900cc six-cylinder engine with detachable head allied to four-speed Wilson pre-selector gearbox, the control for which is mounted above the steering wheel (“the last word in suppleness and silence” according to the advertising literature of the period), the 15hp was offered at £495 ex-works. Testament to the company’s products came when a four-year-old 20hp with 54,000 miles recorded travelled from Lahore to London (6,000 miles) at an average of 140 miles a day and 17 miles per gallon. Announced in October 1927, the 15hp models were offered with the same range of coachwork to be found on the 14hp chassis, the main difference lying in the 15hp’s six-cylinder sleeve-valve engine as opposed the OHV four-cylinder of the 14hp. The Fifteen was quiet, smooth and flexible with a top speed of 55mph and soon proved its worth in endurance events like the RAC Rally and the Monte Carlo. In October 1930 a change to a vee-shaped radiator modernised the car’s looks whilst a lower centre of gravity and widened chassis introduced in 1928 had improved stability. In February 1929, after some 2500 chassis had been laid down, the Mk2 was introduced. The water pump was moved and driven off the camshaft, a new steering arrangement adopted in 1932 (worm and nut replacing the old worm and segment system), the radiator design was altered, gear ratios changed, and the handbrake improved. In July 1929 the fuel tank was moved from the scuttle and mounted at the rear, capacity being increased to 12 gallons. Further revisions had been introduced in March 1930 including the introduction of the Wilson pre-selector gearbox, a banjo rear axle and re-siting of the handbrake lever to the driver’s side of the car. By now the 15hp was a big improvement on the old 14hp from which it had been developed and production was to continue until 1934 when the 17hp model was introduced. Formed in 1919 by a merger between Armstrong Whitworth and the Siddeley Deasey Motor Company, Armstrong Siddeley would become world famous for its engineering, the roots of which stemmed from its prowess in aircraft production. Indeed, an advertising slogan of the time was ‘The Car Of Aircraft Quality’. Operating from the works in Parkside, Coventry the Company remained in business until 1960 when it merged with Bristol and effectively disappeared. 1930 Armstrong Siddeley 15HP Sunshine Coupe UY 9161 AS64868 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

1932 Talbot 14/45 Scout Tourer RH 5145 30831 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £15,000 - £20,000

1933 Rolls-Royce 20/25 Owen Sedanca Three-Position Drophead Coupe AUV 980 GZL61 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £50,000 - £60,000

1936 Ford 10 Model CX De Luxe Touring RD 7970 C31174 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

JEFF HARRIS: Brooklands pre-WW2 race history Post-War competition history and extensively restored during the 1990s / 2000s Meadows 4ED 1496cc engine with Lea Francis close-ratio gearbox and Cozette supercharger VSCC eligible single-seater “In 1936 probably because of something to do with being bored in my daily round of common tasks, I felt an urge to do something positively constructive and the idea was born to build a racing car with which to have some fun.” Born of this premise, work on what was to become the Stafford Special began in a shared mews garage in Denmark Villas, Hove in 1936. Working all and every evening for the next two years, Rodney Stafford (d.1981) sourced a Meadows 4ED 1500cc engine, which had proved itself in the racing Lea Francis team cars in 1929, mated to a Cozette supercharger, and then set about designing the rest of the car around it. A simple channel section chassis was constructed by Blaker Engineering Company and quarter-elliptic springs were made to run to the rear axle which was located by two sheet steel radius arms swiveling on ball mountings on either side of the cockpit. A solid axle shaft was made up by Laystalls, the crown wheel and pinion being of Poldi steel and constructed by Rogers Bros. Some 16lbs was trimmed from the flywheel whilst Sercks produced a special radiator using their highly efficient ‘Hell Cooler’ block. A Marendaz front axle suspended on semi-elliptic springs with conventional Hartford friction dampers was fitted together with a Marles steering box mounted on the offside of the chassis giving 2.5 turns lock-to-lock. Fuel was located in a rear tank of seven gallons capacity pressurized by a hand pump. The “brilliant light blue” bodywork was entrusted to a Mr. Davis who “made a perfectly marvelous job” of producing the svelte panels in 20-gauge aluminum. After a few test runs and speed trial events in 1937 including one at Lewes, it was realized a few modifications would be needed to make it truly competitive. Domed high compression magnesium alloy pistons were sourced from Martlets and the blower was overhauled to give around 15lbs of pressure. The front axle was replaced with a Rover unit allied to Riley 9 wheel carriers and brakes. The car sat lower and was found to be “considerably more potent”, handling and stopping “magnificently”. Indeed, during practice for a 1938 race on the Campbell Circuit at Brooklands the car was able to hold a 3.3 Bugatti, 2-litre Alta, and 1500 Maserati at bay initially. Unfortunately, the infamous handicapping system worked against them in the event! Sadly, the outbreak of hostilities in 1939 put an end to any further racing and development and the car was laid up for the duration of the war. Shortly after peace returned, complete and running, it was bought from Sportscar Garages, Ripley, by John Colborne-Baber who would later become well-known for his Volkswagen dealership based in the South of England. He completed with the car in events at Prescott, Weston-super-Mare, and the Brighton Speed Trials, before selling it on to Richard Shakespeare in 1951. His wife enjoyed some success in the car before it passed through the hands of a number of others, including Sir David Gamble (1951), Murray Beacroft (1953), John Grice (1963), and Tony Mitchell (1971), gradually becoming more tired as the years went by, before being purchased (minus its engine) by Riley enthusiast Tim Ely in 1972. In 1990, the remains were swapped for a new VW Golf GTi with Peter Colborne-Baber - the son of the second owner. The car sat for the next few years until the decision was taken along with Works Manager and racing driver, John Markey, to rebuild it to as near as possible original specification. Because of the numerous Riley parts fitted they offered the project to Ian Gladstone of Blue Diamond Services. It was discovered that Blakers still existed and they straightened the chassis whilst a Riley Merlin open prop shaft rear axle, with a similar track to the original, was fitted. As many of the original parts as reasonably could be were used in the rebuild including the radiator, fuel tank, and dashboard. The original engine had by now been reunited with its chassis so a replacement was sourced by Bill Roberts along with a gearbox. These were overhauled and a Cozette supercharger was built up and installed. As the original aluminum bodywork had started to powder a replacement was crafted by Lawrence Kett of G&A Fabrications of West Molesey, Surrey, this being painted by Andy Coxhead of 355 Ltd. Upon completion, the car ran in various VSCC events including a Brooklands Sprint, Goodwood Sprint, and Shelsley Walsh whilst also making an appearance at the Chateau Impney Hillclimb in 2015. Despite not having been campaigned recently it is said to be “on the button” and in lovely order. This historic special is accompanied by a wealth of information including correspondence, specification sheets, numerous photographs, drawings, and a VSCC Eligibility Document dated 2005. It is now available for inspection prior to the auction – please contact the office to arrange. 1936/38 Stafford Single-Seater Un-Reg 1 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £65,000 - £85,000

JEFF HARRIS: Reputedly last in service with The Barnsdale Garage & Engineering Co Ltd during 1955 and then laid-up for decades Restored and re-registered with the DVLA in 1990 Current family ownership for twenty-three years but scarcely used since 2017 Prompted to enter the London taxicab market in 1929 by a generous order from dealers Mann and Overton, Austin soon upset the status quo. Based on the redoubtable 12/4 chassis, the Longbridge manufacturer’s ‘High Lot’ model was cheaper, easier to maintain and more reliable than its Morris Commercial and Beardmore opposition. Updated in 1934 as the ‘Low Loader’ or ‘LL’, the Austin boasted ample luggage space next to the driver and four seats to the rear compartment (though, two of these were of the ‘fold down’ variety). Among the more expensive coachwork options, Strachan Successors Ltd’s Landaulette design featured a retractable rear roof that allowed passengers to make the most of any clement weather and intricate wooden door cappings. Famously durable, the 12/4’s 1861cc sidevalve four-cylinder engine was allied to an equally stoical four-speed manual gearbox both of which promised years of faithful service. First registered in London (or so its ‘DLN 66’ number plate would imply), chassis BS80865 is understood to have remained in service until at least 1955 latterly with the Barnsdale Garage and Engineering Co Ltd of West Riding, Yorkshire. Dry stored for decades thereafter, it was self-evidently restored before being re-registered with the DVLA during August 1990. Entering the current family ownership twenty-three years ago, the Austin has been used for film hire and weddings as well as high days and holidays. Starting readily upon inspection following a recent temporary repair to the engine’s cylinder head, the 12/4 has been primarily garaged since 2017 and would thus benefit from recommissioning. Finished in traditional Blue over Black livery, correct coachwork fittings include the roof mounted 'For Hire' sign, the taxi fare meter and the Metropolitan Police Fare Table. Comprehensively re-trimmed at a cost of circa £5,000, this appealing ‘Low Loader’ represents an iconic piece of British street furniture from a bygone age and would be welcomed on the HCVS’ London to Brighton Commercial Vehicle Run and at exclusive taxicab events. For more information, please contact: Damian Jones damian.jones@handh.co.uk 07855 493737 PLEASE NOTE: Since the catalogue went to press we have been contacted by Mark Cooper of the London Vintage Taxi Association who has very kindly provided the following information: From the left, the ledger columns show; Customer (first owner) J B Motors (almost certainly a taxi rental garage) Chassis no. 80865 Engine no. 81503 Seat no. 1018 (etched into the underside of the seat base) and date of arrival from the trimmers shop (08.01.1937) Coachbuilder - Strachans (Successors) Ltd. of Wales Farm Road, Acton, London W3. Date taxed - 14.01.1937 at a cost of £10 for the year. Registration no. DLN 66 1937 Austin 12/4 'Low Loader' Taxi DLN 66 BS80865 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

1938 Humber Snipe Imperial DUO 705 6001276 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

JEFF HARRIS: Converted into a Trials Special by Cyril Crosby, foreman of Vauxhall's Experimental Engine Test Department, during the 1940s Bodied using the scuttle and doors from a Singer Le Mans plus a bespoke ash frame Uprated with a 1500cc, 12hp engine in 1948 which was then supercharged Multiple class award winner from 1947-1955 Starting life as a Bedford HC 10hp 5 cwt butcher’s van, this very successful trials special has a fascinating history that the vendor has been able to unearth since acquiring it in 1965. When the war was declared in 1939 the van was commandeered by the Government for active service. In 1942 it was returned to the baker with 20,000 miles recorded resplendent in a khaki color scheme. It was subsequently acquired by Cyril Crosby, a Vauxhall employee (foreman of the Experimental Engine Test Department) who had competed in motorcycle events since 1925 and was looking for a suitable donor in order to create a special that would be able to compete with Morgans and MGs in trials. He stripped the vehicle and sold off the body, replacing it with a Singer Le Mans body scuttle and two doors as the manufacture of a shell would have been difficult to build in his home workshop. An ash frame and remaining panels were constructed by him and his old sidecar passenger, who happened to be a skilled sheet metal worker, including the bonnet, windscreen frame and petrol tank. The chassis side members were modified and a cross member installed that allowed the engine to be moved back some seven inches. A strong tubular cross member was added to the rear to cope with the twin-mounted spare wheels. The brakes remained standard although an MG fly-off handbrake was modified and fitted as well as a remote-control gear change. At first, the original engine of 1203cc was retained but after being damaged in 1948 on a difficult trial stage it was replaced by a 1442cc 12hp unit bored out to 1489cc to get as close as possible to the 1500cc maximum permitted. A non-standard cylinder head for use with Rover flat top pistons was fitted and shorter pushrods were installed to cope with the 6,000-rpm potential as opposed to the standard unit’s 3,800 rpm. A new inlet manifold and special exhaust system were also fabricated. A Marshall Rootes-type supercharger was added giving a 6psi boost allied to a 1 ¼ inch SU carburetor. The engine was repositioned to give as near as possible perfect weight distribution and neutral handling characteristics for both circuit and trials work. In competition trim the car weighed in at 1800lbs which was about equal to the MG T Type two-seaters it regularly competed against. Between 1947 and 1955 it was entered in numerous events and was extremely successful gaining many class awards and outright first places including 1st 1948 MCC Exeter Trial, 1st 1949 MCC Land’s End Trial, Triple Award 1950 Land’s End Trial, 1st 1952 Land’s End Trial, 1st 1952 1-hour Silverstone, 1st 1953 Land’s End Trial etc. A detailed list of its awards is contained in the accompanying history file. Mr Crosby eventually sold the car in the mid-1950s and the vendor purchased it from a lady in Luton in 1965. On passing her driving test she had asked her husband for a sportscar and was said to be somewhat in awe of the available performance! By now the car had deteriorated and a considerable amount of work was needed to restore it properly although this was mainly mechanical as the body had remained in good order. Before work commenced Mr Crosby got in touch having heard about the project and some of the gaps in its story were filled. Upon completion of the mechanical side the body color was changed from red to white, the seats welded in and refurbished, and the chrome work replaced. No longer campaigned in trials, it was enjoyed on the road and became a regular on the Kent vintage rally circuit. A detailed history file is offered with the car including Swansea V5C, photos of it competing in the period, assorted invoices, correspondence including a letter from its builder Cyril Crosby dated 1980 giving details of the specification and build, magazine articles from the 1940s, a list of awards achieved, buff logbook, repair and service manual, Bedford van instruction book, book of the Vauxhall Fourteen Velox and Twelve-Six and rally plaques from the early 1970s. The vendor now summarises the car’s condition as having “average” bodywork, “very good” engine and “good” electrics, transmission and interior trim. As an appealing and successful trial special with a known and fascinating history, EXW 513 is now ready for the next chapter in its interesting life. 1938 Vauxhall 12hp Supercharged Trials Special EXW 513 HC1903 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

1939 Bentley 4.25 Litre Vanden Plas-style Tourer 941 EXC B122MR H&H 8th Sept 2021 £140,000 - £160,000

H&H Auctions: 1 of just 379 examples made and the rarest of the T-type's Mille Miglia eligible and Fiva registered Subject to an extensive mechanical overhaul in 2019 In 1936 MG launched the TA. A successor to PB Midget, it was the first of the larger ‘T Series’, with power from an overhead-cam engine. May 1939 saw the launch of the TB, which appeared identical but boasted an entirely new ‘XPAG’ engine. It’s 1250cc had a shorter stroke, a higher rev ceiling and an increased maximum power output increased to 54.4bhp at 5,200rpm, lending itself to performance tuning. The introduction of production for the war effort brought MG car production to a temporary close in September 1939. Just a mere 379 TBs had been produced, making the model by far the rarest of the ‘T Series’ Midgets. 1 of just 379 examples made and an example of the MG TB, the rarest of the T series MGs. Finished with Black paintwork and trimmed in Red leather, ‘MXS907’ is fitted with period correct with Jaeger chronometric instruments in the dashboard and was subject to an older restoration some 20 years ago. A bit of a TV star, MXS907 was driven by Guy Martin in the Channel 4 programme, ‘Guy Martin’s Battle of Britain’. The factory original 1250cc engine is still in the car and ‘MXS907’ still retains many correct features such as the auto lube system, fuel reserve switch and TB air-inlet manifold. In 2019 the car was subject to an extensive mechanical overhaul. The body was removed in order to have the chassis fully restored, due to the chassis being encased in underseal by the previous owner. Purchased from a widow, MXS907’s documents were promised, however, they were not passed on and it was placed on an age-related plate. It is Mille Miglia eligible and is also FIVA registered. The vendor currently grades the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, transmission, gearbox and trim as ‘very good’ with the paintwork as ‘good’. 1939 MG TB MXS 907 TB 0464 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £45,000

1943 Ford GPW Jeep NXS 976 118325 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

H&H Auctions: Formerly the property of Oscar-winning actor Rex Harrison Understood to have served with the 6th Armoured Division in World War 2 Pleasingly retaining many genuine WW2 parts Subject to a full service and mechanical fettling in July 2021 Arguably more iconic than a Sherman Tank or P-51 Mustang, the Jeep is for many the definitive WW2 vehicle. Equipped with a torquey L-headed 2.2-litre engine driving all four wheels via a three-speed manual box and two-speed transfer case, the tough, go-anywhere four-seater did its job exceptionally well. By the end of the war, 647,870 Jeeps had been produced - 281,448 of which were manufactured by Ford. This 1943 example of the Ford GPW is thought to have served with the 6th Armoured Division during the Second World War before residing in Italy after the end of the war, being registered ‘GE 62652’. The Jeep is subsequently understood to have been painted in Green over the original paintwork, which is being carefully removed in areas and revealing the original wartime painted decals. Entering into the ownership Rex Harrison, the Oscar-winning film star who played Professor Henry Higgins in ‘My Fair Lady’ (Lerner and Loewe's great musical masterpiece) and Dr John Dolittle in ‘Doctor Do Little’. The Ford GPW still retains many of its genuine WW2 features including the body-tub, front bumper, early bonnet, combat wheels shod with Firestone Bargrip tyres, very scarce lubrication bags, rare USA shovel and the canvas and frame are thought to be original too. Fitted with a period Willys MB unit (with engines commonly changed during WW2), the GPW has been subject to a 12-volt conversion. Miscorrectly declared as manufactured in 1947 by the DVLA, ‘XBV 227’ will be supplied with a letter from the IMPS (Invicta Military Preservation Society) and MVT (Military Vehicle Trust) stating the correct date of manufacture as 1943 for the DVLA rectification. Imported into the UK in 2015, the Ford GPW is accompanied by a UK-plates which will be fitted in time for sale, copies of Italian paperwork and a logbook relating to Rex Harrison's ownership, two images with Rex Harrison in the Jeep including one depicting himself and Rita Hayworth and a current V5C. Subject to much mechanical fettling in July 2021 including engine and ignition system service, a new master cylinder, fuel system flush and new points, plugs and condenser. 1943 Ford GPW Jeep XBV 227 GPW138179 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £25,000 - £30,000

JEFF HARRIS: Believed to be one of just two such examples made (and sister car to chassis 800320 which has been pictured in various marque histories) Exhibited at the world famous Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance in 2017 Supplied new to Switzerland and resident there until the late 1990s after which it underwent an extensive restoration A true Grande Routiere that would grace any collection Delahaye’s most famous model – the Type 135 – was introduced at the October 1935 Paris Salon. Notably stiffer and lower slung than those of its predecessors, the newcomer’s chassis featured box-section side rails, two substantial cross members, welded-in floor panels and a steel transmission tunnel. The independent front suspension comprised a lower transverse leaf spring and upper wishbones allied to longitudinal torque arms, while the live rear axle was supported by semi-elliptic leaf springs mounted outside the main chassis rails. Large cable-operated drum brakes (housing Bendix self-wrapping shoes) were complemented by high geared worm and nut steering. Initially powered by a 3.2 litre OHV straight-six engine, the Type 135’s obvious competition potential was amply demonstrated by Lucy Schell’s Works-supported Ecurie Bleue machines. Outright wins at the Coupe d’Automne, Mont Ventoux hillclimb (1936), Donington 12-hours (1937) and Le Mans 24-hours (1938) not to mention near misses on the Mille Miglia, RAC Tourist Trophy and Spa 24-hours all cemented Delahaye’s position among France’s premier marques. Indeed, Rob Walker’s Type 135 Speciale outlasted and outran Alfa Romeo 8C 2900 and Talbot T150SS opposition at the 1939 Whit Monday Brooklands meeting to claim the title of ‘Britain’s Fastest Road Car’. Available from 1936 until the company’s closure eighteen years later, the Type 135M boasted a 3.6 litre engine and could be optioned with triple carburettors and a Cotal electromagnetic four-speed gearbox. Lacking its own coachbuilding facilities, Delahaye entrusted Type 135 chassis to the cream of France’s ateliers including: Figoni & Falaschi; Letourneur et Marchand; Alphonse Guilloré; Marcel Pourtout; Frères Dubois; Jacque Saoutchik; Marius Franay; Henri Chapron; Faget-Varnay and Antem; the result being some of the most flamboyant bodywork ever seen. Delahaye put the Type 135M back into production after World War Two but found that the market for ‘Grande Routiere’ cars had all but collapsed. Thought to be one of just two examples to wear this particular style of Cabriolet coachwork by Graber of Switzerland, chassis 800269 was supplied new to Lucerne. Illustrated in the books Delahaye: La Belle Carrosserie Française and Delahaye: Le Grand Livre, the sister car – chassis 800320 - was offered for sale with a guide price of $450,000 - $650,000 during 2017. Conscious of the masterpieces that their French rivals had created on the same chassis, Graber came up with a particularly elegant and confident design which lets its complex panel curvature ‘do the talking’ rather than relying on flashy chrome accents. Migrating to Bern in 1956, chassis 800269 moved to Thun two years later where it would remain in single ownership until 1998. The subject of a high quality, detailed restoration thereafter which saw it mechanically gone through, the Delahaye was also treated to a sympathetic bodywork refurbishment, interior re-trim and fitted with a new hood. Many of the original fittings such as the Cream steering wheel and O.S. instruments were carefully renovated. Utilised by its previous keeper for a number of rallies, the four-seater has been cosmetically enhanced since entering the current ownership such that it was invited to attend the world-famous Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2017. Uprated with a more powerful Type 12S 103 engine at some stage (rumoured to have been installed by the factory) that sports three inlet and six exhaust ports plus triple Solex carburettors, the Type 135M is said to be ‘more than capable of keeping up with modern traffic’. Equipped with Cotal’s ingenious electromagnetic four-speed gearbox, it offers a rewarding and engaging driving experience. Part of a significant private collection in recent years, this magnificent Graber-bodied Delahaye is seemingly reading for further concours duties or touring. They say that ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder’, well to our eyes at least ‘VXS 968’ is one hell of a looker! 1946 Delahaye Type 135M Cabriolet VXS 968 800269 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £250,000 - £300,000

JEFF HARRIS: mported from the United States in 2021 Subject to brake fettling and new tyres just previous to importation Accompanied by V5C and Classic American Automobile Club dating certificate After the original Willys MB and Ford GPW had helped win WW2 for the allied forces, the Jeep evolved, into post-war civilian and military versions. The CJ series was developed for civilian requirements, of course retaining all-wheel drive that enabled the Jeep, like its predecessors, to go practically anywhere. Some 1.5 million CJ models were built before the introduction of the Wrangler finally ended production in 1986 - the basic design has remained virtually unchanged throughout. In production between 1945 and 1949 and aimed primarily at the farming market and was the first Jeep model following the iconic ‘Wartime Jeep’. Manufactured in 1946, this Willys Jeep CJ-2A is understood to have been supplied new to America and is fitted with the 2.2-liter straight-four engine mated to the three-speed Borg-Warner T90 manual gearbox. Presented in Sand with padded seats and Black frames, the Jeep was imported into the United Kingdom in 2021 and registered ‘OXS 324’. Benefitting from new tyres and overhauled brakes just prior to being shipped from America, the Jeep has been subject to an engine service since landing. Accompanied by a current V5C document and a Classic American Automobile Club dating certificate, the Jeep also has the hood frame, canopy, and door sides finished in Black faux leather. 1946 Willys CJ-2A Jeep OXS 324 CJ2A61396 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £10,000 - £14,000

1947 Bentley MK VI Saloon MJO 609 B76CF H&H 8th Sept 2021 £24,000 - £28,000

H&H Auctions: Recently subject to £5,000 bare-metal repaint Accompanied by its Heritage Certificate confirming matching numbers Finished in gleaming two-tone Black & Maroon with Bordeaux Red leather Benefiting from a professionally fitted 5-speed gearbox (the original factory gearbox will be supplied with the car) The Jaguar MKIV was Jaguar’s first car following World War II and was produced between 1945 and 1948. Manufactured using a 120” separate chassis featuring beam front and live rear axle suspension on semi-elliptic springs and Girling mechanical brakes, it was offered with three engine variants; four-cylinder 1½ Litre, or six-cylinder 2½ / 3½ Litres coupled to a four-speed manual gearbox. The stylish all steel coachwork was available in four-door saloon or drophead coupe configurations featuring the kind of luxurious interior typically associated with Jaguar. In addition, it featured distinguishing chrome headlamps and prominent chrome radiator grill. Very few of these magnificent Jaguars were built for the right-hand markets as steel was being rationed for goods for export. This desirable 3½-litre, right-hand drive saloon was supplied on 17th February 1947 by official Jaguar dealer, Henlys of London, to a Mr E Paxman. It boasts matching numbers substantiated by the accompanying Heritage Trust Certificate which also confirms that the car was originally finished in Birch Grey. Mr Paxman subsequently exported his beloved Jaguar to the US state of Kentucky where it resided until being repatriated to the UK in August 2002. Our vendor, being the sole attentive custodian for some 17 years, is now reluctantly selling this venerable Mk IV due to reducing storage capacity. Following his acquisition, it has enjoyed regular maintenance, care and dry storage. The car benefits from a professional five-speed gearbox conversion making OAS 724 more suited to modern traffic and road conditions. Additionally, in early 2021 it was subject to a bare-metal repaint costing £5,000 and is now elegantly presented in gleaming Black over Jaguar Maroon. Accompanied by its Heritage Certificate, the V5, a history file containing an assortment of documents, and the original gearbox, should a new owner wish to return it to standard. This really is one of the nicest MkIVs we have seen, and we highly recommend any interested parties to view the car to satisfy themselves as to its quality. 1947 Jaguar 3.5 Litre MKIV Saloon OAS 724 610837 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £34,000

1948 Bentley MK VI Saloon JYN 276 B220DA H&H 8th Sept 2021 £24,000 - £28,000

JEFF HARRIS: Chevy V8 305ci engine mated to GM Hydra-Matic TH350 transmission Fitted with Vintage Air air-conditioning system and Kenwood radio/CD player Finished in two-tone Green and features a Tuxedo Grey tweed interior General Motors' Advance Design Series of trucks, represented the company's first post-war reshape and were claimed to be bigger, stronger and sleeker than the AK model they replaced. The newcomers quickly acquired a loyal following and were produced with only minor amendments from 1947 to 1955, during which period the Chevrolet brand topped the American truck sales charts. The attention to detail of this awesome custom Pickup has to be seen to be fully appreciated. To quote what is understood to be an accompanying American appraisal: 'This is one spectacular vehicle with the body expressing expert workmanship. The Chevy is resplendent in two-tone Green and features a Tuxedo Grey tweed interior. One-off billet and steel custom parts abound. The front suspension is Mustang II with 2-inch drop spindles by Heidt. The rear end is a Ford 8-inch set-up with a 2.79:1 axle ratio. The brakes are Mustang II, while the steering is power-assisted rack and pinion’. The Pickup rides on TQ Halibrand-style five-spoke alloy wheels. Power comes from a 305ci (5000cc) Chevy V8 engine that drives through a GM HydraMatic TH350 transmission. The massive specification includes a Vintage Air air-conditioning system and Kenwood radio/CD player and the truck is offered with its original US title and HM Revenue & Customs duty paid document. 1948 Chevrolet 3100 Pickup
A2305565 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £24,000 - £26,000

1948 Triumph 2000 Roadster OEV 300 TRA317 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

H&H Auctions: A rare surviving example of BMW's 'Baroque Angel' 501 The subject of much restoration work by TT Workshops in the late 1990s / early 2000s Understood to have been in the UK since the 1960s Unveiled at the April 1951 Frankfurt Motor Show, the BMW 501 was priced at 15,000DM which was not only four times the average German salary at the time but also rather more than arch-rival Mercedes-Benz was charging for its equally new 220 model. Penned in-house by Peter Szymanowski, the Bavarian machine’s extravagantly curvaceous steel bodywork soon saw it nicknamed the ‘Barockengel’ (Baroque Angel). Based on a brand-new perimeter frame chassis featuring independent front suspension, four-wheel drum brakes and a type of rack and pinion steering, the luxury saloon was powered by a 1971cc straight-six OHV engine allied to four-speed manual transmission. Reputedly capable of 84mph and praised by the contemporary press for its comfort levels, the BMW proved a slow seller with just 2,125 examples of the initial 501 variant being made between 1952 and 1954. The presence of numerous period BMW Car Club Bulletin magazines and an invoice for new seals and fuses which were apparently despatched to a Mr John Knowles suggest that chassis 42172 has been in the UK for nigh on sixty years. Acquired by its previous keeper as a restoration project in 1990, the 501 doubtless benefited from his ownership of a firm specialising in the fabrication of commercial vehicle bodies. Entrusted to renowned Bristol and pre-WW2 BMW specialist TT Workshops Ltd for an engine overhaul in 1999-2000 and a gearbox refurbishment during 2002, the saloon started readily and ran well during our recent photography session. Pleasingly retaining a host of original details including its headlining-mounted clock, passenger grab handle, rear ashtray and ‘Baroque Angel’ steering wheel centre, ‘VYX 24’ now presents as an older restoration. A rare sight in Germany and hen’s teeth scarce here in the UK, this voluptuous 501 is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, instruction manual, period brochure, maintenance diagram, copy TT Workshops bills, sundry other paperwork and fresh MOT certificate. 1951 BMW 501 VYX 24 42172 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £13,000 - £16,000

1951 Daimler DB18 Special Sports 443 YUY 59035 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £35,000 - £40,000

1951 Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith Limousine LXT 20 WME 3 H&H 8Th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: The subject of a stalled restoration which commenced in 2017 and came close to completion Bodywork restored and repainted, interior re-trimmed and mechanical components overhauled Dry stored for much of its life and thus believed to have covered just 50,000 miles from new Thought to be one of only 1,000 or so 4AB Roadsters made, chassis 4AB7922 was despatched to supplying dealer G. Healey & Son of Gloucester on 25th October 1951. Road registered as ‘LDD 336’ early the following month and uprated with a larger Singer 10hp OHC engine at some stage, the four-seater is understood to have spent much of its life in dry storage. ‘Mothballed’ when the vendor’s late husband first encountered it some thirty-five years ago, he finally managed to buy the Roadster on May 14th 2017. A highly skilled welder and fabricator who had restored everything from a Bullnose Morris Tourer to a Bedford CF Day Van via various Alvis cars, the vendor’s late husband began stripping the Roadster as soon as it came off the trailer! Sadly, his death earlier this year prevented the project’s completion. However, as even a cursory inspection will confirm, a huge amount of cosmetic and mechanical work has been carried out. Finished in Red with Black upholstery, ‘LDD 336’ sports a wood-rimmed steering wheel, turned aluminium dashboard, fabric hood and full-length tonneau cover. The odometer shows a credible but unwarranted 50,000 miles. Worthy of a return to the road, this attractive Singer is offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, copy Service Manual, Singer Owners’ Club correspondence and sundry paperwork. The Singer Roadster was a two-door, four-seater Convertible version of the Bantam Saloon and was first sold in 1939. The traditional body comprised alloy panels fixed to a wooden frame. Power came from the same 1074cc four-cylinder OHC engine found in the Bantam, but the output was slightly higher (36bhp), courtesy of a superior inlet manifold and downdraught SU carburettor – sufficient for a top speed of around 65mph. The unit was initially mated to a three-speed manual gearbox. The suspension was by leaf springs all round and the drum brakes were mechanically operated. The model re-emerged virtually unchanged after the war and remained so until the 4A variant of 1949. This featured a Solex carburettor in place of the SU and benefited from a four-speed gearbox. The 4AB of 1950 sported a new chassis with independent coil spring front suspension and a mix of rod/hydraulic brakes. For more information, please contact: 1951 Singer 4AB Roadster LDD 336 4AB7922V H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: 1 of just 303 made, current ownership since 2012 and extensive history file Treated to a bare metal restoration in 1996 and subsequently awarded various concours awards at Alvis Owners' Club meetings Uprated in period with a more powerful TC21 engine and more recently enhanced via the installation of a five-speed manual gearbox, power steering and Halogen headlights etc Originally earmarked for the American market where Alvis had hoped sales would be plentiful, chassis 25116 was converted from left- to right-hand drive and completed on 9th October 1953. Delivered to marque concessionaire Brooklands of Bond Street, London W1 the following month, it was issued with the local registration number ‘NYU 817’. The Drophead Coupe’s first years are a mystery but by the mid-1960s it had relocated to Aberdeen and been upgraded with a more powerful TC21 engine. Belonging to J. Buchan and A.J. Burrell that decade, the four-seater then passed to George Winram of the Aberdeen Blind Company in whose family it would remain until being bought by hotelier Neil James of Inverurie during 1996. Mr James entrusted the TA21 to the Kinghorn Bodyshop of Aberdeen for a photographically documented, ‘bare metal’ restoration with assorted parts being sourced from marque specialists Walkers Radiators and Red Triangle. Featured in various Alvis Owners’ Club Bulletin magazines thereafter, ‘NYU 817’ achieved a degree of success in concours competitions. Migrating to Edinburgh and the custodianship of Dr Richard Legge in 2003, the Drophead Coupe was then resident in Brecon with Andrew Morton before being bought by Londoner Nicholas Broadhead during 2010. The latter had Red Triangle fettle the brakes and suspension, carry out some minor bodywork repairs, convert the engine to unleaded fuel, replace the exhaust and renew the underseal not to mention fit an alternator, Kenlowe fan, modern stereo, power socket (with USB insert) and halogen headlights. The associated invoices on file total some £20,000. Further improved since entering the current family ownership in October 2012, the vendor’s late husband – a skilled welder and fabricator with numerous restorations to his credit – installed variable rate electric power steering and a five-speed manual gearbox for more relaxed high-speed cruising. Still highly presentable albeit not concours, ‘NYU 817’ started readily upon inspection and ran well during our recent photography session. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, restoration photo albums and history file. Introduced at the March 1950 Geneva Salon, the Alvis TA21 was powered by a brand new 3 litre, straight-six OHV engine. Featuring a seven-bearing crankshaft and near ‘square’ (84 x 90) bore and stroke dimensions, it proved notably smooth and flexible. Based around a sturdy box-section chassis equipped with independent coil and wishbone front suspension, a 'live' Salisbury back axle, telescopic shock absorbers and four-wheel Girling hydraulic drum brakes, the TA21 was a natural rival to the Bentley MKVI and Lagonda 2.6 litre. Available in either Mulliner Sports Saloon or Tickford Drophead Coupe guises, it was deemed by Autocar magazine to be fitting for ‘discerning owners who appreciated quality and good handling as well as mere performance’. Decidedly rarer than its ‘tin top’ sibling, just 303 Drophead Coupes were made. 1953 Alvis TA21 Drophead Coupe NYU 817 25116 H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: Subject to a previous gearbox overhaul by Ristes Motor Company Ltd in 2016 121,000 recorded miles and current ownership since 2016 Offered with a collection of invoices and old MOT's This R-Type has an interesting early history in that it was supplied new by Jack Barclay to its first owner, Captain Christopher Soames MP of Chartwell Farm, Westerham, Kent, the husband of Sir Winston Churchill’s daughter, Mary. By the 1970s the car was domiciled in the USA where it remained until 2006. Reimported to the UK, it was subject to some £12,000 of recommissioning carried out by marque specialists Ristes Motor Company. In 2016 a further £3,320 was spent on additional recommissioning works with Herne Motors and the gearbox overhauled by Ristes. In the current ownership since 2016, it currently registers c.121,000 miles and is described by the vendor as having “average” bodywork and paintwork, “good” engine plus interior and a “very good” gearbox. B188UM is offered with Swansea V5c, R-Type book and a collection of invoices and old MoTs. The R-type was introduced in June 1952, so named because the chassis designations of the Mark VI model on which it was based had reached the letter R. The newcomer featured a much longer boot capped by a one-piece alloy lid whilst detail changes included an automatic choke, two-speed wipers and rear window de-mister. In October the same year, the General Motors four-speed Hydra-Matic automatic transmission was made an option. 1953 Bentley R-Type Saloon OLM 108 B188UM H&H 8th Sept 2021 £16,000 - £20,000

H&H Auctions: 1 of just 295 right-hand drive examples made Supplied new via Henlys Ltd of London to Lt. Col. S.E. Sanders of Gainsborough Treated to a body off, chassis up restoration by Jaguar Classic Restorations of Cape Town from 2004-2008 (just 1,200 miles ago) Matching chassis, engine, and body numbers plus original registration number The thirtieth of just 295 right-hand drive Jaguar XK120 Drophead Coupes made, chassis 667030 was completed on 29th September 1953 and supplied new the following month by Henlys Ltd of London to Lt Col S.E. Sanders of Gainsborough, Lincolnshire. Road registered as ‘NYF 410’, the two-seater was reputedly taken off the road in the late 1960s. Belonging to a Norfolk farmer by 1980, he got as far as refurbishing the chassis before a divorce saw the still immobile Jaguar sold to Paul Watkins of Milton Keynes in 1984. A commercial airline pilot, Mr. Watkins disassembled the Drophead Coupe but did little else to it. Acquired by renowned marque enthusiast Chris Jacques during 1999, chassis 6670303 joined a stable which included one of the famous XK120 Lightweight competition cars but again aside from a steering box rejuvenation little was done to it. Progress finally came when the two-seater was sold via Retro Classics Ltd of London to the chairman of the Cape Jaguar Club in South Africa, Jonathan Mayne in October 2003. Mr Mayne entrusted the Drophead Coupe to Jaguar Classic Restorations (Cape) where it was treated to an exhaustive, near ‘nut and bolt’ rejuvenation which took over four years to complete. The original engine was overhauled as were the gearbox, brakes and suspension. The chassis and body were refurbished by Fine Blast of Philippi and the cockpit re-trimmed by FS Interiors using Suede Green Connolly leather sourced from the UK Hide Company plus a Suffolk & Turley supplied mohair hood. The interior woodwork was renewed and British Racing Green paint was chosen to adorn the exterior. Aside from the addition of an electric cooling fan, the car was returned to factory specification almost throughout. Further improved by SG Classic Cars of Chempet in 2013 including the fitment of Vredstein radial tyres all round and sundry detailing, the XK120 was repatriated to the UK five years later. Joining the vendor’s private collection in April 2019, that same month saw ‘NYF 410’ uprated with a wood-rimmed Moto-Lita steering wheel and seatbelts by Cotswold Classic Car Restorations at a cost of £2,149.20. Further benefiting from a minor brake overhaul at the hands of Miles Classic Ltd during June 2019, the Drophead Coupe has only covered some 1,200 post-refurbishment miles. Considered by the seller to be in ‘very good’ (paintwork, electrical equipment, interior trim) or ‘excellent’ (engine, gearbox, bodywork) condition, this decidedly handsome XK120 is offered for sale Jaguar Heritage Certificate, V5C Registration Document and detailed restoration/parts invoices. Famously built as a mere showcase for Jaguar's all-new 3442cc DOHC XK straight-six engine, the XK120 Roadster caused a sensation when it was unveiled at the 1948 London Motor Show. Utilizing a shortened MKVII chassis complete with independent front suspension, a ‘live’ rear axle and hydraulic drum brakes, the lithe two-seater possessed class-leading performance and road holding. Such dynamic excellence was rewarded with numerous victories including the 1950 RAC TT and 1951 Liege-Rome-Liege Rally. Arguably, the defining sportscar of its generation, a perilously shaky post-WW2 British economy gave the Coventry manufacturer little choice but to concentrate on overseas sales. Introduced in April 1953, the Drophead Coupe was not only the last but also the rarest XK120 derivative. Offering significantly better weather protection than its roadster sibling, the newcomer featured a fully lined hood with an integral frame and wind-up windows. An elegant-looking machine regardless of whether its soft-top was up or down, the two-seater boasted a rich wood veneer dashboard and matching door cappings. Only in production between April 1953 and August 1954, just 295 of the 1,765 XK120 Drophead Coupes which rolled off the Browns Lane assembly line were to right-hand drive specification. 1953 Jaguar XK120 Drophead Coupe NYF 410 667030 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £75,000 - £90,000

JEFF HARRIS: Original UK supplied XK120 roadster finished in Old English White with contrasting Black leather interior Subject to a 9-year extensive restoration with renowned Jaguar specialist Collier Street Garage between 2004 and 2013 at a cost in excess of £63,000 Features enhancements including front disc brakes, electronic ignition, and aluminium radiator with Kenlowe fan Launched at the 1948 Earls Court Motor Show, the Jaguar XK120 Roadster caused a sensation. Penned by Sir William Lyons, the model's sensuous lines seemed almost impossibly glamorous to a country still feeling the effects of rationing. While the 120mph top speed that its name signified soon became the stuff of legend. Literally flooded with orders, Jaguar began limited hand-built production soon thereafter (although, it was not until 1950 that the factory was sufficiently 'tooled-up to discard aluminium in favor of steel for the curvaceous bodywork). Based around a cruciform-braced box-section chassis equipped with independent torsion-bar front suspension, a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle and hydraulic drum brakes, the lithe two-seater proved equally adept on-road or track winning both the RAC TT and Alpine Trial during 1950 (the former victory coming at the hands of Sir Stirling Moss). Credited with 160bhp and 190lbft of torque in standard tune, its legendary 3442cc DOHC straight-six engine was allied to four-speed manual transmission. Arguably, the defining sportscar of its generation, a perilously shaky post-WW2 British economy gave the Coventry manufacturer little choice but to concentrate on overseas sales. EXO 821 (or Chassis 661104) is one of the more sought-after ‘home market’ Jaguar XK120s, delivered new via Rossleigh Jaguar, Edinburgh after leaving Brown’s Lane in September of 1953, at that time in British Racing Green with Tan interior and Fawn hood. EXO 21 has been in its current combination of Old English White with contrasting Black leather interior since at least 1987, if not earlier, and was entrusted to renowned Jaguar specialists Collier Street Garage in 2004 by its previous owner, who had the car between 1987 and 2017. The brief was to ‘comprehensively restore the car to fine running condition’, and Collier Street garage did just that. The engine was overhauled with replacement pistons and cranks, any areas of corrosion rectified, a ‘bare metal’ respray, replacement wiring loom, and much more, with invoices totaling in excess of £63,000. Enhancements at this time included front disc brakes, an aluminium radiator with a Kenlowe fan, electronic ignition, and more. The restoration was completed some 9 years later, in 2013. EXO 21 was acquired by its current owner less than 2000 miles after restoration in 2017 and the odometer currently displays 17,746. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission, and interior trim all as ‘Very Good. Included with the vehicle are invoices totaling approximately £75,000, several previous MOT certificates, and the original continuation logbook. PLEASE NOTE The vendor informs us he has completed some 3,000 miles in his ownership, and not the 16,000 previously stated. 1953 Jaguar XK120 OTS Roadster 821 EXO 661104 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £85,000 - £95,000

JEFF HARRIS: Current ownership since 2000 An export example repatriated in 1999 Understood to have been fitted with a 1500 engine in 1955 The final iteration of the pre-war Midget concept was the 'TF' and, like its predecessors, proved massively popular in the USA. It was a development of the TD Mkll, and the TF's most obvious differences from the older car are its raked radiator grille, lowered bonnet line and faired-in headlamps. First introduced in October 1953, the TF was powered by the XPAG 1250cc engine from the TD. Produced from 1953 - 1955, only 3,000 TFs rolled out of Abingdon with the great majority going to the USA in LHD format. As a LHD export model ‘DSL473’ headed for California in November 1953, remaining in one family’s ownership until repatriation to the UK in 1999. In 1955, the original 1250cc engine was replaced with the later 1500cc engine by the supplying dealer. It wears the original Ivory colour with a Black interior. In current UK ownership since 2000 the TF was converted to RHD during a professional restoration. In 2005 it had an engine overhaul by Steve McKie Sport cars followed by the fitment of a 5 speed Ford gearbox and carburettor overhaul. A collection of invoices, old MOTs and a British Motor Heritage Trust certificate are included in the sale. The vendor currently grades the bodywork, interior trim, paint, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork and transmission all as ‘very good’ 1953 MG TF DSL 473 HDP46858 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

JEFF HARRIS: Supplied new to Group Captain Sir Douglas Bader, CBE, DSO & Bar, DFC & Bar, DL, and notable as his first Alvis Well maintained since undergoing an extensive restoration during 2010-2012 1 of just 81 TC21/100 chassis to wear Tickford Drophead Coupe coachwork Introduced in 1953, the Alvis TC 21 was a natural rival to the Bentley MKVI and Lagonda 2.6 litre. Powered by a 2993cc OHV straight-six engine allied to four-speed manual transmission, it could be had in Mulliner Sports Saloon or Tickford Drophead Coupe guises. While, those looking for more performance could specify the TC21/100 or 'Grey Lady' version which benefited from a higher compression cylinder head and taller final drive ratio. Credited with 100bhp and a headline-grabbing 100mph top speed, only eighty-one TC21/100 Drophead Coupes were made. The first Alvis purchased by Group Captain Douglas Bader, ‘OYU 979’ was also the first car to be delivered to a member of the public with Manumatic transmission control. Bader’s friendship with J.J. Parkes, the Managing Director of Alvis, was doubtless a factor in the Coventry manufacturer deciding to fit the system which withdrew the clutch automatically, synchronised the engine revs and engaged the new gear. The famous World War Two fighter ace went on to own TD21 and TF21 models and became renowned at the factory for his perfectionism and occasional impatience! Sold to second owner, Mrs Madeleine C. Cave, by Charles Follett of Mayfair for the princely sum of £850, a letter on file from her recalls a subsequent roadside encounter with Bader during which he remarked: ‘How is she? Glad to see her looking so good’. Retained by Mrs Cave for twenty years during which time a conventional clutch was installed by Alvis, the TC21/100 is known to have subsequently passed to Mr Brown, Mr P.J. Heron and Mr T.J. McKenna prior to entering the current ownership in 2015. Treated to an extensive and photographically documented restoration from 2010-2012 and said to have been ‘well maintained’ ever since, the Drophead Coupe has become a frequent visitor to the Goodwood Revival. A historically important motor car, ‘OYU 979’ is offered for sale with extensive paperwork including copy build sheets, owner’s handbook, sales brochure, period press articles and restoration details etc. 1954 Alvis TC21/100 Drophead Coupe OYU 979 25554 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £70,000 - £85,000

1954 Mercedes-Benz 220 Saloon 141 HYX 187011-3503621 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £21,000 - £25,000

1954 MG TF KDN 248 HDC165681 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £20,000 - £24,000

1955 Citroen H Van 396 UYJ 68945 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: Highly desirable Fourth Series variant with the stronger De Dion tube rear suspension and larger 2.5 litre V6 engine Subject to a bodywork restoration during 2011 A UK supplied car re-finished in its original cellulose livery Believed to have covered just 44,000 miles from new ‘Time was when Lancia had its own unique style and disdained convention. Its cars were often inordinately beautiful or, at the very least, resonantly elegant in their thinking. None more so than the Aurelia B20 GT, which married timeless style with idiosyncratic engineering and an enviable competition pedigree. It remains one of the most captivating Lancias ever, and so by definition one of the most enthralling of all road cars, period . . . You will probably never read a negative report on the Aurelia B20 GT. And that’s because it is truly – genuinely – brilliant. Nothing from the same period comes close for polished road manners. And that’s before you even look at one’ (Richard Heseltine, Motor Sport magazine) Designed by the legendary Vittorio Jano, the Lancia Aurelia B20 GT proved a formidable competitor distinguishing itself on the: Mille Miglia (2nd overall, 1951), Le Mans 24-hours (class win, 1951 and 1952), Targa Florio (outright win, 1952), Liege-Rome-Liege Rally (1st overall, 1953) and Monte Carlo Rally (outright win, 1954). The road car choice of contemporary F1 drivers Juan Manuel Fangio, Jean Behra and Mike Hawthorn, the sleek, fastback Coupe bristled with innovation including independent front suspension, a compact V6 engine, rear-mounted transaxle and potent four-wheel drum brakes. Evolving through six series, a mere 3,121 had been sold by the time that production ceased in June 1958. A rare beast indeed, chassis B20-3624 is understood to be one of just twenty-five Aurelia B20 GTs to have been officially imported by Lancia England. A desirable Series IV variant with the larger 2.5 litre V6 engine and improved De Dion rear suspension, it was purchased new by the vendor’s uncle. The proprietor of The Eastern Counties Plant Hire Co Ltd with an engineering background, he became so enamoured of the Aurelia that he later added a Lancia dealership to his business portfolio running a series of Flaminias, Flavias and Fulvias. The seller was allowed to drive the B20 GT when it was just a year old and she only eighteen. A Cambridge car all its life, ‘OER 696’ was the sole ‘foreign interloper’ allowed inside her late husband’s garage which otherwise housed some truly significant Aston Martin, Lagonda and Bentley motorcars. Given the number of Lancias her uncle owned, the vendor tells us that she has no reason to think that the 44,000 miles shown on the Aurelia’s odometer does not represent the total covered from new! Accompanying paperwork suggests that chassis B20-3624 had its factory-fitted engine overhauled in 1959 and had covered a mere 39,563 miles by April 1975. Looked after by David Wall Vintage & Classic Cars of Norfolk for the last few decades, the Lancia has had attention paid to its brake system, fuel system, wiper mechanism, drive shafts and rear transaxle not to mention a bare metal bodywork refurbishment in its original Dark Green which was completed during 2011 (two pack being covered with six coats of cellulose). Starting readily and running well during our recent photography session, ‘OER 696’ is being returned to Mr Wall so that it can be presented for sale with a fresh MOT certificate. As well as working on the car for years, he has fond memories of driving it from Lands End to John O’Groats with the vendor’s late husband. The original plan was for them to contest the ‘Le Jog’ event. However, they felt that the lack of sleep necessary to be competitive was uncivilised. Coming to auction for the first time in its sixty-six year history, this very special Aurelia B20GT is worthy of close inspection and another long-term custodian! Offered for sale with original buff logbook, Lancia Consortium paperwork and numerous bills / invoices. A surely unrepeatable opportunity. 1955 Lancia Aurelia B20 GT OER 696 B20-3624 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £100,000 - £120,000

1956 Bentley S1 Saloon 470 APG B231BC H&H 8th Sept 2021 £32,000 - £36,000

JEFF HARRIS: First of the iconic six-cylinder 'Big Healeys' The subject of a fully documented restoration and less than 1000 miles covered since Offered with a removable 'Works-specification' hardtop "After a really gruelling road test, I can say that this new sports model is ideal for Continental touring. It also stood up to lap after lap of the Nürburgring at racing speeds, without complaint, and that must be equivalent to a vast mileage under more humane conditions. Finally, it has the kind of appearance that will make many prospective purchasers reach for their cheque books." – John Bolster on the Austin-Healey 100/6, Autosport, 12th October 1956. Introduced in 1956, the 100/6 represented the most radical step forward in the Big Healey's development. Despite its initial success, sales of the original Austin-Healey 100 had begun to decline by the mid-1950s and so the model was revamped as the '100/6', BMC's 2.6-litre C-series six replacing the original four-cylinder Austin Atlantic engine. At the same time, the wheelbase was lengthened from 7' 6" to 7' 8", which enabled the inclusion of two occasional seats in the rear of the BN4 variant. In 100-6 tune the pushrod six produced 102bhp - 12bhp more than its predecessor - though the inevitable weight gain meant that there was little if any improvement in performance, the car's top speed remaining at 103mph or thereabouts. Although stylistically very similar to the preceding 100, the 100/6 was nevertheless easily distinguishable by its 'crinkle' radiator grille and bonnet-top air intake. In 1957 an improved six-port engine became available, and this 117bhp unit was fitted to all the newly introduced BN6 two-seater roadsters. The top speed improved to 111mph and 1.7 seconds were cut from the 0-60mph time. Originally a left-hand drive model, this BN6 roadster underwent a full and comprehensive restoration during 2014-15 and was converted to right-hand drive in the process. Purchased and imported by Gordon Scott of Hayward & Scott (classic car component fabricators), it still presents like a recent restoration should and runs and drives well. The car was finished 'in-house' to a particularly high 'no expense spared' specification, including a 'Works' hardtop, front disk brakes, alternator, inertia reel seatbelts, new chrome wire wheels (shod with XAS tyres), together with a bespoke (and quite beautiful!) exhaust system and manifold. This wonderful Big Healey is accompanied by a V5C Registration Document and records of its restoration including photographs of the car throughout the process, a Heritage certificate, a small number of receipts and a letter from Mr Scott confirming the works that were carried out. Well-maintained six-cylinder Healeys provide a fabulous driving experience and this example presents extremely well in a wonderful, yet unusual colour combination. Ready to enjoy, '779 UYG' demands a close look for anyone seeking a practical and stylish sports car with some subtle upgrades, that simply couldn't be replicated for even a fraction of the guide price. Please note - this is vehicle is supplied with a tonneau cover and hood frame. 1958 Austin Healey 100/6 BN6 779 UYG BN6-L/857 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £38,000 - £42,000

1958 Citroen 2CV AZ 735 UYO 472875 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £13,000 - £16,000

JEFF HARRIS: Understood to be the second oldest MK IX to survive The 20th MK IX made and originally registered as 777 MEV Owner by the current vendor for c.45 years Offered with heritage certificate, Brown logbook and MOT certificate from 1973 According to the accompanying Heritage Certificate this MkIX Saloon, the 20th car built, was manufactured on 24th September 1958 and originally finished in Cornish Grey over Mist Grey with Dark Blue interior trim. The original registration mark allocated was 777 MEV. Its first owner was a David Currie of Chelmsford, as recorded on the buff logbook retained in its history file. It subsequently passed through the hands of a couple more owners in the Chelmsford area and has now been with the vendor for around 45 years. Understood to be the second oldest example to survive, it is offered for restoration with the aforementioned Heritage Certificate, buff logbook, an MoT certificate from 1973 and displays 35,884 miles. The roots of the luxuriously equipped and potent MKIX Jaguar lay in the MKVII that had been launched at the 1950 London Motorshow. The MKVIII of 1956 brought added opulence to the interior and a few detail changes to the outward appearance (most noticeably the move to a curved single-piece windscreen), while the MKIX delivered a 3.8-litre 220bhp version of Jaguar's all-conquering DOHC XK engine, servo-assisted disc brakes all-round and recirculating ball steering. Motor magazine's test of an automatic example returned a 0-60mph time of 11.3 seconds and top speed of 114.4mph - no mean figures for a 16ft-plus Saloon weighing in at 4,000 lbs. 1958 Jaguar MK IX [Restoration Project] Un-Reg P770020BW H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

1959 Aston Martin DB MKIII RKU 901 AM300/31818 H&H 8Th Sept 2021 £130,000 - £150,000

H&H Auctions: One of only 325 Peerless’ that are thought to have been manufactured Subject to a comprehensive body-off restoration by a Peerless Register member in 2014 Supplied with original ‘buff’ logbook and owner’s manual Potentially eligible for Goodwood and hill climb events A racing mechanic with considerable experience of spaceframe construction, Bernie Rodger was approached by John Gordon (later of Gordon-Keeble fame) and James ‘Jimmy’ Byrnes to built the prototype of a new 2+2 sports saloon: the Warwick. Byrnes and Rodger had decided that money could be made in the low volume production of a readily available, low-cost sports GT. For Jimmy Byrnes, it had been a natural choice to consider using Triumph TR mechanical components, as more or less the entire management board of Standard-Triumph were regular customers at his new restaurant. Noteworthy features of this very pretty Italianate GT included leaf-sprung De Dion rear suspension and the Triumph TR3 2.0-litre engine, overdrive gearbox, and front suspension, including its disc brakes. By the time production began in 1958 the car had been renamed 'Peerless' with the name deriving from the Slough premises at which it was originally manufactured and where redundant World War 1 American army lorries were once prepared for re-sale. Bodies were now of glassfibre construction instead of the prototype's aluminium panelling. A very capable car, the Peerless had room for a family and its luggage, while being good for a top speed of more than 110mph (177km/h) and cost a relatively affordable £1,500. Unfortunately for Peerless, this was approximately the price of a Jaguar 2.4-litre saloon. In 1958 a solitary Peerless started the Le Mans 24 Hour Race; the only four-seater in the field, it finished in a highly creditable 16th place overall. Despite a favourable reception and the valuable publicity gained from its Le Mans exploits, Peerless was soon in financial difficulty and production ceased in 1960 after an estimated 325 cars had been made. Bernie Rodger then revived the design in improved form as the Warwick, but by the end of 1961, this too had gone. However, that was not quite the end of the Peerless saga; John Gordon and Jim Keeble then took the concept a stage further, fitting a Chevrolet V8 engine into a Peerless-type chassis to create the Bertone-styled Gordon-Keeble of 1964. This ultra-rare Peerless GT was manufactured in 1959 and first registered on the 16th of January 1959 to a Mr Leslie Helier Cody of Kensington who was the son of Samuel Franklin Leslie Cody a member of No 41 Squadron Royal Flying Corps during WW1 and grandson of the world-famous ‘Col’ S. F. Cody who was a circus performer and aeroplane maker. Fitted with the 1991cc straight-four engine mated to the four-speed manual transmission with overdrive, the Peerless was originally finished in Grey but is now presented in the attractive colour scheme of Pale Yellow with Grey interior upholstery. Passing through two subsequent keepers to Cody in the first three years, the Peerless entered fourth ownership in which it remained until the 1980s. Entering the previous (Peerless Register member) ownership in 2003 following long-term storage, ‘647 GBH’ was subject to a body-off restoration which was completed in 2014. Purchased by the vendor in 2019, the Peerless has since benefitted from engine servicing, new rear brake shoes and much further remediation work in 2021 to the cost of c.£960, although the Peerless’ speedometer has stopped working between the 2020 and 2021 MOTs (recorded mileage 93,849 miles). Offered with history file which comprises the original buff logbook, past MOTs and invoices, original owners manual and current V5C. 1959 Peerless GT II 647 GBH GT2/00111 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £25,000 - £30,000

1959 Triumph TR3A 3435 DA TS59031 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £32,000

1960 Jaguar Mk II 3.8 910 NMY 201608DN H&H 8th Sept 2021 £36,000 - £42,000

JEFF HARRIS: Supplied new via Jaguar Cars of New York to V.F. Sastarich Matching chassis and engine numbers and uprated with a later Jaguar all-synchromesh four-speed manual gearbox Pleasingly retains much of its original Red leather upholstery offset by a new West of England cloth headlining and Opalescent Silver Grey paintwork According to its accompanying Jaguar Heritage Certificate, chassis 887598 was completed on November 21st 1962 and shipped to Jaguar Cars, New York shortly thereafter. Originally finished in Cream with Red upholstery, its first owner is recorded as V.F. Sastarich. Stated to have been ‘beautifully restored’ and to have covered ‘only 47,000 miles’ when advertised for sale during 2004, the E-Type was resident in the dry state of Texas the following decade. Pleasingly retaining its original ‘matching numbers’ engine block, the two-seater had been uprated with a later Jaguar all-synchromesh four-speed manual gearbox and wood veneered auxiliary instrument panel by the time the vendor imported it to the UK. As well as thoroughly recommissioning the Fixed Head Coupe, he had it fitted with European specification indicators front and rear and resprayed in lustrous Opalescent Grey Metallic. The engine bay was detailed and what is thought to be the original Red leather upholstery complemented by a new West of England cloth headlining. Rated by the seller as ‘overall a superb example which drives beautifully’, this stunning E-Type has been NOVA’d with all relevant duties paid. Famously launched at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, the Jaguar E-Type created a furore. Its combination of supercar performance, superb styling and a low price tag left rivals reeling and customers clamouring. While, early sportscar racing success at the hands of Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori amongst others helped cement its reputation. Built as a monocoque with a front sub-frame to cradle the engine, the model's combination of all-round independent suspension (torsion-bar front / coil-sprung rear) rack and pinion steering and four-wheel disc brakes gave it excellent roadholding and handling capabilities. Fed by triple SU HD8 carburettors and topped with a 'straight port' DOHC cylinder head, its indomitable 3781cc straight-six engine was quoted as developing some 265bhp and 260lbft of torque. Allied to a four-speed Moss gearbox (with synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th), it reputedly enabled the low-slung two-seater to sprint from 0-60mph in 6.9 seconds and onto 150mph. While any E-type Fixed Head Coupe is desirable, the lithesome free-revving 3.8 litre cars enjoy a particularly exalted status. Dating from early in the production cycle before Jaguar responded to popular demand for greater comfort and refinement, they arguably represent the automotive icon in its purest form. 1962 Jaguar E-Type 3.8 Coupe T.B.A 887598 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £70,000 - £80,000

1962 Jaguar E-Type 3.8 Roadster 912 XVL 877718 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £90,000 - £110,000

1963 Jaguar MKII 3.8 XMR 238A 231414DN H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

JEFF HARRIS: One of only 76 or so examples bodied to Park Ward's Design No. 2035 in both LHD and RHD Supplied new to FJL Green Esq by Weybridge Autos of Surrey complete with air-conditioning and an MPH / KMH speedometer Resident in the car-friendly climate of Australia for most of its life Introduced in Autumn 1962, the S3 Continental was notable as the last Bentley to be coachbuilt on a separate chassis. Powered by a 6230cc OHV V8 engine allied to four-speed automatic transmission and reputedly capable of nigh-on 120mph, the newcomer was ferociously expensive. One of the more striking bodystyles available, Mulliner Park Ward’s Design Number 2035 was a beautifully sleek Fixed Head Coupe featuring a 'straight-through' wing line, 'cut-back' wheelarches, diagonally-positioned quad headlamps and subtle tail fins. Understandably popular among contemporary celebrities such as Jayne Mansfield, Fanny Craddock, Sir John Mills, Harry Belafonte and Keith Richards, just 312 S3 Continentals of all types were completed between 1962 and 1966. However, Mulliner Park Ward’s Design Number 2035 only accounted for seventy-six of these (in both left- and right-hand drive). More expensive when new than an Aston Martin DB5 or Ferrari 250GT Lusso, the Bentley S3 Continental had more road presence than either rival. Understood to be one of less than fifty right-hand drive examples to be bodied by Mulliner Park Ward to its sleek Design Number 2035, chassis BC138XC was initially supplied by Weybridge Autos to F.J.L. Green Esq. As well as specifying a speedometer calibrated in miles and kilometres, Hirschmann electric aerial, Blue Sundym glass, electric windows and combined parking and blinking lights, Mr Green had the Fixed Head Coupe fitted with air-conditioning (the height of luxury for a 1960s British car). Relocating to California early on, the S3 Continental had covered an indicated 82,000 miles by early 1982 when the renowned Antipodean Rolls-Royce & Bentley specialist Robert McDermott purchased it for his own use. Mr McDermott subsequently sold the Fixed Head Coupe but continued to maintain and improve it for the next two keepers up until 98,140 miles in September 2001. Pleasingly retaining its original Red leather upholstery, chassis BC138XC has been cherished as part of a private UK collection since 2015 during which time its odometer reading has increased from (1)13,396 miles to (1)20,000. Twice driven to Le Mans by the vendor’s sons (who were very appreciative of the air-conditioning), it has benefited from regular servicing and fettling including a headlight upgrade, suspension set-up, hydraulic tappet overhaul, sundry re-chroming, replacement heater matrix and refurbished electric window motors etc. The brake pipes have been routed inside the car, while a hi-torque starter motor and twin electric fans are sensible concessions to modern traffic. Starting readily and performing well during our recent photography session, the S3 Continental passed its most recent MOT test on August 13th 2021 with ‘no advisories’ and is said to be ‘a dream to drive’. Drawing admiring glances wherever it goes and blessed with one of the nicest dashboards ever to adorn a Bentley, ‘DSA 643B’ has lost none of its glamour or sense of occasion over the last fifty-seven years! 1964 Bentley S3 Continental MPW Fixed Head Coupe DSA 643B BC138XC H&H 8th Sept 2021 £160,000 - £190,000

JEFF HARRIS: Early '1964.5' car that was converted for competition usage by Classic Racing Cars Ltd of Seighford, Staffordshire Used for a variety of road rallies, hill climbs, sprints and FIA sanctioned circuit racing since its completion in 2006 Sparingly driven since a gearbox overhaul in 2012 with its last silverware being collected at Curborough in 2018 This stunning-looking Mustang Competition Car was bespoke built for our founder Simon Hope. Ever one to maximize his return on investment, the brief given to Gary Spencer of Classic Racing Cars Ltd, Seighford was to create a machine that could be used for circuit racing, sprinting, hillclimbing and road rallies. Put simply, Simon wanted a ‘Tour Auto’ car that could promote H&H at as wide a variety of events as possible. A notably rare 1964 ½ model year Hardtop Coupe, chassis 5F07F195568 was built at Ford’s Dearborn, Michigan plant complete with a 260 cu in (4.2 litre) V8 engine. Migrating to Europe sometime thereafter, it was found to be remarkably straight and corrosion free when sourced for the project. Chemical dipped and seam welded, the bodyshell was further reinforced via the installation of a FIA compliant roll cage. Tim Adams Racing Engines supplied a suitable 289 cu in (4.7 litre) V8 running on 98 RON fuel with a booster which was allied to a T&C four-speed manual gearbox. A brand new rear axle with limited-slip differential and competition driveshafts was added as were Kelsey Hayes front disc brakes gripped by four-pot callipers. A quick-ratio steering box was fitted along with a fuel cell and facet pump etc. The purposeful interior was given Recaro bucket seats, drilled pedals, aluminium door cards and a plumbed-in fire extinguisher system not to mention a bespoke dashboard and Brantz trip meter. Rewired throughout, the electrical system also benefited from an alternator and the requisite ‘kill switch’. Putting the cost of the donor to one side, the initial build cost some £70,000 and was completed literally moments before the Mustang lined-up for the September 2006 Tour Britannia. Treated to a further £12,000 worth of fine-tuning encompassing the fitment of new shock absorbers all round and a waxoyl treatment plus much set-up work, the Ford was issued with a MSA HTP (Historic Technical Passport) on April 4th 2007. Winning its circuit debut – a Tin Top race at Silverstone – with Nick Whale sharing the driving duties, the Hardtop Coupe subsequently competed at the likes of Brands Hatch, Donington and Knockhill. It proved every bit as versatile as Simon had hoped allowing him to tackle Prescott Hillclimb, the Benjafield’s Racing Club Cornbury Sprint and the Jersey Festival of Motoring to name but a few. Aside from one minor contretemps with a fellow competitor at the Silverstone Classic, the Mustang has enjoyed an accident-free competition career. Sparingly used since a gearbox overhaul in 2012, it last ran in anger at a Curborough meeting during 2018. Taken to the occasional show and event since then, the Ford is only being offered for sale because Simon has reluctantly decided that his racing days are probably over. Coming to market at a fraction of its build and subsequent maintenance cost (the incomplete bills on file total over £100,000), ‘DUJ 278B’ represents a comparatively affordable entry to a huge variety of historic motorsport. 1964 Ford Mustang Notchback Race/Rally car DUJ 278B 5F07F195568 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £50,000

JEFF HARRIS: Current ownership since 1989 Understood to have covered 107,500 miles Subject to an extensive restoration completed in 2009 Large collection of invoices plus old MOT's Coopercraft front brakes and Koni shock absorbers This notably early 4.2 E-Type was supplied new in LHD form via Jaguar Cars of New York. It left the factory in December 1964 but appears not to have been registered to its first keeper, a Curtis Whitlow Hammons, until July 1967. It is possible it was retained as a demonstrator during this period. ‘ABM306B’ remained in his ownership prior to being imported to the UK by SNG Barrett and sold to Midland Sporting Classic Cars of Burton from whom the vendor acquired it in 1989. It has therefore had just two private owners from new and the mileage of c.107,000 miles is believed to be correct. Retaining its original engine and subframe, the car was subject to an extensive restoration which was completed in 2009. Converted to RHD, it also received new outer sill panels, new door skins, rear arch repair panels, new foot wells and lead loading around the rear hatch. The vendor advises the remainder of the bodywork is original including the boot floor, monocoque floor and bonnet. Originally painted blue with navy blue leather, it was repainted in Carmen Red with pale grey interior by Suffolk & Turley. A detailed record of expenditure accompanies the car. A number of recognised changes to original specification have been made to improve the driving experience and include; Coopercraft four-pot front brake callipers, XJ Series Two rear brake callipers, XJ12 3.07 LSD, Copper brake lines, Koni shock absorbers, hidden small modern washer motor and a US-made ‘Coolcat’ fan operated by a restored Otter Switch. Cared for to a high standard since, the vendor now rates the bodywork, paint, and trim as “excellent” and engine & transmission as “very good”. Offered with a large collection of invoices and old MoTs this fine-looking E-Type could not be replicated for the asking price. Launched at the 1961 Geneva Salon, the Big Cat was the fastest production car of its time - capable of hitting 60mph in a whisker over seven seconds and a top speed of 150mph. Certainly few could match its reputed 150mph top speed. At a time when Ferrari's lauded 250SWB and 250GTO made do with 'live' rear axles, the E-type utilised a sophisticated independent rear set-up with inboard disc brakes. While, rack and pinion steering enhanced the monocoque chassis's excellent roadholding and handling; putting it light years ahead of American designs like the Corvette. The engine size was increased from 3.8 to 4.2-litres in October 1964 and, with the change, came a sweeter all-synchromesh gearbox, better brakes and electrical systems, and more comfortable seats. The suspension was independent all round with wishbones and torsion bars at the front and wishbones, radius arms and twin coil springs at the rear. Braking was by servo-assisted Dunlop discs all round; inboard at the rear. The steering was a rack and pinion system by Alford and Alder. Though the 4.2-litre engine had more torque than its predecessor, an increase in both gearing and bodyweight meant the performance of these later Series 1 cars was very similar to their earlier 3.8-litre siblings. 7,770 4.2-litre Fixed Head Coupes were built between 1964 and 1968. 1964 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Coupe ABM 306B 1E30366 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £80,000 - £90,000

JEFF HARRIS: Subject to a comprehensive restoration between 1998 and 2000 and has benefitted from approximately £20,000 further expenditure in the last ten years Great condition and previous Lancia club concourse winner Extensive history file with MOTs supporting the mileage of 60,440 (atoc) miles Original right-hand-drive example, one of just 40 manufactured The Lancia Flavia, a medium-sized executive car, launched initially with a 1500cc overhead valve, horizontally opposed four-cylinder aluminium engine which was mounted ahead of the front wheels providing a drive with plenty of torque. Combined with the independent front suspension and beam axle at the rear, this provided great road holding while the dual-circuit, servo-assisted all-round disc brakes gave the Lancia Flavia exceptional braking combined with front-wheel drive performance making it a very advanced vehicle from its time. Launched at the 1960 Turin Motor Show and introduced in major European markets during the next 12 months. Coupé and convertible versions developed by Pininfarina and Vignale quickly followed, the Pininfarina-styled coupé entered production on a shorter chassis, this was soon followed by the announcement of the highly attractive four-seater convertible version by Vignale. When released, the design was revolutionary and remains elegant and timeless to date. Performance improved over the next ten years, in 1963 engine capacity was increased to 1.8 litres taking the top speed over 100 mph and the larger engine displacement gave the car more torque at the bottom end, making the Flavia convertible a potent sports car for its generation. Vignale built just 1,601 two-door convertibles from 1962 to 1967 and it is believed just 40 were righthand drive making it an incredibly rare and collectable version of the Flavia. This incredibly handsome and sought-after original right-hand drive example was manufactured in 1964, being first registered in the UK on the 2nd of October 1964. Fitted with the 1.8-litre flat-four engine mated to a manual gearbox, it is presented in Navy coachwork with complementary Grey hide interior upholstery and has covered just 60,440 miles (at time of consignment) from new. Restored between the dates of 1998 and 2000, at which time the colour was changed from Red to Navy Blue, there is photographic documentation of the restoration is included in the history file. Having been cared for by the very best including Richard Thorne, Omicron and Tanc Barratt during its recent life, invoices demonstrate that the car has been subject to much expenditure, with over £20,000 spent in the last ten years, post the restoration which was completed in 2000. In January 2020 the Lancia was enlisted Richard Thorne Classic Cars to perform a full annual service including all oils and fluids, adhere to any bodywork imperfections and tune the engine, also providing a compression test. ‘TAS 116’ was also the beneficiary of a carburettor overhaul at a similar time. The extensive history file comprising documenting the Lancia’s life; invoices from the restoration together with the aforementioned photographs (illustrating the high standard workmanship); numerous past MOT test certificates; the owner's handbook/service manual including wiring diagrams; an extensive selection of invoices dating to the late 1990s; past logbooks; tax discs and a current V5C document. This Lancia is a genuine, rare, four-seat convertible and in its original right-hand drive is sure to attract attention. 1964 Lancia Flavia Vignale Convertible TAS 116 8153352099 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £46,000

1964 Triumph TR4 APH 547B CT9457 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £30,000 - £34,000

1965/2004 Shelby AC Cobra 427 CSX Carbon Fibre CS04 COB CSX4502 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £130,000 - £150,000

1966 Austin-Healey 3000 MKIII
HBJ838058 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £50,000 - £60,000

1966 Mercedes-Benz 300 SE Cabriolet FSF 625D 11202322008932 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £30,000 - £40,000

JEFF HARRIS: Just emerged from an extensive, three-year, bare metal mechanical and cosmetic restoration Matching chassis and engine numbers and all original panelwork An exceptionally sharp car which would not disgrace a concours field Among the last century's great motoring icons, Jaguar's E-type has always inspired loyalty and devotion. Born out of the fabulous D-type racer, the model soon acquired a strong competition heritage of its own. Launched at the 1961 Geneva Salon, the Big Cat proved faster and more glamorous than virtually any production rival. Certainly few could match its reputed 150mph top speed. At a time when Ferrari's lauded 250SWB and 250GTO made do with 'live' rear axles, the E-type utilised a sophisticated independent rear set-up with inboard disc brakes. While, rack and pinion steering enhanced the monocoque chassis's excellent roadholding and handling; putting it light years ahead of American designs like the Corvette. Revised in 1964, the E-type gained a torquier 4235cc powerplant and four-speed all-synchromesh gearbox of Jaguar's own design. Introduced in late summer 1967, the so-called Series 1.5 cars boasted improved braking and cooling capabilities. Short lived, just 1,231 LHD Series 1.5 E-Type 4.2 Fixed Head Coupes were reportedly made prior to the arrival of the Series 2 in August 1968. If you are in the market for a Jaguar E-Type Series 1 Fixed Head Coupe then we would urge you to come and inspect this example before buying another car. Completed on 15th August 1967, chassis 1E34597 was supplied new to Lieutenant Commander Robert H. Dumbaugh of the US Navy. Taken off the road during the late 1990s, the two-seater spent almost twenty years in store with an Oklahoma-based restoration company before being imported to the UK. A Jaguar specialist, the vendor has spent the past three years painstakingly refurbishing the E-Type and tells us that the Fixed Head Coupe not only retains its original engine and gearbox but also all its original panels. Finished in Opalescent Silver Grey with contrasting Red leather upholstery, we estimate that the work would have cost in the region of £250,000 + VAT had it been carried out by a ‘big name’ restorer. Indeed, the seller informs us that he dares not count-up the man hours which have gone into the project. Converted to right-hand drive and fitted with triple SU carburettors, ‘ABW 516F’ further benefits from an alloy radiator, twin cooling fans and new MWS wire wheels. Starting readily upon inspection and running very sweetly, this drop dead gorgeous E-Type is understandably described by the seller as being in ‘excellent’ condition with regard to its engine, gearbox, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. Offered for sale with UK V5C Registration Document, Jaguar Heritage Trust Certificate and a large quantity of bills. Viewing is highly recommended! 1967 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Coupe ABW 516F 1E34597 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £100,000 - £120,000

JEFF HARRIS: Subject to extensive and documented restoration using a heritage shell in 1992 In current enthusiast ownership for the last 29 years and always stored in a carcoon Subject to over £30,000 in expenditure since 1992 Offered with an MOT valid until 28 May 2022 Introduced in 1962, the MGB Roadster enjoyed an eighteen-year production run. With nicely balanced handling and a good turn of speed, it merited the old MG marketing slogan 'Safety Fast'. Based around a monocoque chassis featuring independent coil-sprung front suspension and a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle, its 1798cc 'B' series four-cylinder engine was allied to a four-speed manual transmission. Capable of over 100mph, the provision of front disc brakes and rack-and-pinion steering greatly aided control. Presented in Tartan Red with contrasting black leather interior, KBV 722F was manufactured in 1967 and has been in current ownership for a staggering 29 years. In February 1992 when it was acquired by its current custodian, KBV 722F was subject to a comprehensive restoration with a heritage shell and has since been used enthusiastically throughout Europe in rallies and shows, picking up 1st in class awards at the Cumbria Classic Car Show in ‘06, ‘09 and ‘12. KBV 722F has always been stored in a carcoon, and features Overdrive on 3rd and 4th, Ditto chrome wire wheels, parabolic springs, an uprated camshaft, twin 2.5’ SU Carbs, stainless steel exhaust, chrome boot rack, Moto-lita steering wheel, wind deflector and Mohair hood with tonneau cover. Currently displaying a warranted 41,000 miles since its restoration, the vendor rates the interior trim as ‘’good’, the condition of the bodywork and paintwork as ‘’very good’’ and the engine, electrical equipment and transmission and gearbox as ‘’excellent’’. Included with the vehicle is a comprehensive folder including MOT certificates every year from 2021 to 1992, then from 1979 down to 1974, a photographic history of the restoration and receipts totaling over £30,000. 1967 MG MGB Roadster KBV 722F GHN3/1334869 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £14,000 - £16,000

1967 Piaggio Vespa ‘Super KMS 984E V5SA1T21928 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £4,576
JEFF HARRIS: The subject of much previous restoration work, including a bare-metal photographic respray during 1997 - 1998 Family ownership for more than three decades and just two previous keepers Less than 43,000 miles from new Manual transmission, with overdrive Jaguar's flagship saloon in its day, the luxurious 420G arrived in October 1966 as a – mainly cosmetic – update of the Mark X. Launched in October 1961, the Jaguar Mark X was technically more advanced than preceding Jaguar saloons, featuring independent rear suspension similar to that of the E-Type sports car and the tried-and-tested XK 3.8-litre six-cylinder engine. For a car weighing around two tons, the 120mph Mk X was impressively quick and, like all Jaguar saloons, its interior was exceptionally well-appointed and comfortable. The Mk X was being built with the 4.2-liter engine, an all-synchromesh gearbox and Marles Varamatic power-assisted steering among numerous other improvements by the time the face-lifted 420G (for 'Grand') version came along. Apart from a reshaped front grille and indicator repeater lights, there was little to differentiate the newcomer externally, while within the cabin there were improved seats and a revised dashboard. These alterations would be among the last made to the 420G, which was dropped in June 1970, its place as the forefront of Jaguar's saloon line-up having been taken by the newly introduced XJ6. This striking right-hand drive, manual-transmission 420G is finished in metallic gold with a red leather interior and has been in the possession of the vendor's family since December 1986. Used extensively throughout this period, including long-distance traveling on the continent; the car has been maintained regardless of cost. The most recent work carried out (within the last year) comprises custom inertia reel seatbelts (and matching trimmed covers), a complete rebuild of the front suspension with uprated 'poly bushing and a recommissioned and correctly shimmed steering box (by Kiley Clinton Engineering). Back in 2015, the rear suspension was rebuilt with all new bushes and the shock absorbers were replaced all-around. During the late 90s, it was deemed that the 'big cat', affectionately nicknamed 'Thunderbird II' was in dire need of some TLC and a major restoration commenced. Two photographic albums document this process and depict the car at the various stages, including professional replacement of metal to many of the lower sections. To complement the structural and aesthetic improvements at this time, Aldridge Ltd was tasked with a complete retrim of the car's interior to original specification, charging in excess of £5,000.00 for the work carried out. Starting and running well during our recent photography session, the engine is silky smooth with very good indicated oil pressure - receipts on file document a rebuild by Kearns Richard Services, with drive transmitted through a rebuilt four-speed gearbox. The car boasts an enviable list of subtle improvements and upgrades including Coopercraft 4-Pot front brake calipers, an uprated alternator, spin-on oil filter conversion, 1-2-3 electronic ignition system (distributor retained), and retro-fitted air conditioning. Extensive accompanying documentation consists of the original handbook (in a wallet), sales brochures, a large quantity of receipts, MOT certificates dating back to 1992, and Swansea V5C registration document. 1968 Jaguar 420G T.B.A G1D55188DN H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

JEFF HARRIS: 1 of just 923 right-hand drive, Automatic MKIs manufactured Current ownership since 2008 and only 67,204 (atoc) recorded miles Restored in 2008-2009 following approximately 10 years of dry storage Supplied with a history file including a copy of the original bill of sale Shown at the October 1966 Earls Court Motor Show alongside the technically advanced four-wheel-drive FF, the Touring of Milan-designed Interceptor was quite a sensation and received much praise. The fact Jensen had, in the space of a year, produced two completely new models was also outstanding, particularly as the two companies involved in the project were 680 miles apart. The original design, penned by Touring of Milan, was taken to Vignale of Turin who had the capability to produce the car in far greater numbers than Touring. Fully trimmed and painted bodyshells were then delivered from Italy for assembly at West Bromwich by October 1966. Both new cars had the 330bhp, Chrysler V8 engine coupled to a TorqueFlite three-speed automatic gearbox and fashionable Rostyle wheels were fitted. Manufactured in 1968, this Interceptor I was first registered in January 1968 and is fitted with the 6250cc V8 engine with automatic transmission, one of just 923 right-hand-drive automatic MK1 Interceptors manufactured. The Jensen is finished in its original color of Special Jensen Red with Cream leather interior upholstery and wood center console trim. ‘STN 34F’ has a recorded mileage of just 67,204 miles (at time of consignment) and HPI shows just three former keepers, with the Jensen entering into current ownership in 2008 following being in storage for the previous 10-years. Subsequently restored between 2008 and 2009, comprising bodywork restoration with a bare metal repaint, comprehensive engine overhaul, further mechanical reconditioning, refurbishment of the original interior with new carpets fitted, Rostyle wheel refurbishment, new stainless steel bumpers, and an upgraded remote security locking system. ‘STN 34F’ is offered with a history file which comprises the original Red Interceptor book, a vast selection of past invoices, a copy of the original bill of sale, much sundry paperwork, a current V5C, and past logbook copies, and is supplied with the original jack. 1968 Jensen Interceptor I STN 34F 115/2658 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £50,000

1968 MG B GT OOV 138G GHD4/1577579 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £13,000 - £15,000

JEFF HARRIS: Subject to a self-evident restoration Presented in charming ‘Ferrari Assistenza Corse’ livery Current ownership since c.2016 FIAT'S first commercial vehicle arrived in 1903, only a few years after the company had been established in Turin. FIAT's light vans continued to be based on passenger cars, the most successful of the immediately post-WW2 era being the 1100 ALR, derived from the 1100 saloon. Successor to the FIAT 1100T, the 238 was introduced in 1967 and produced in various versions - van, truck, chassis cab, minibus and ambulance - with engines of either 1,197cc or 1,438cc. The top speed was around 105km/h (65mph). The 238's mechanical underpinnings were sourced from the Autobianchi Primula, which is notable as the FIAT Group's first passenger car to feature front-wheel drive and a transverse engine. Produced in collaboration with Citroën, a Tipo 242 van arrived in 1974 boasting a larger petrol engine and a diesel option. However, such was the 238's popularity that it was made available with 242's larger engine and kept in production until 1983, being replaced by the first of the Ducato series. This 238 B was manufactured in 1969 and was supplied new to Italy. Thought to have originally been finished in White, the Fiat, now presented in period Ferrari F1 support colours and a Black vinyl interior. Entering current ownership and subsequently imported into the UK from Modena, Italy in approximately 2016, the Fiat was not registered in the UK until 2019. Fitted with the 1197cc engine with a manual transmission, the 238 B Van makes and this charming FIAT minibus makes an interesting alternative to the more common British and German light commercials and is offered with a current V5C and Fiat Historic Centre dating letter (Fiat Archivio E Centro Storico). Benefitting from overhauled brakes and front suspension, new master cylinders, a new clutch and five new tyres, ‘RCD 684G’ has also received a panelled and trimmed interior. 1969 Fiat 238 B Van RCD 684G 238B0038264 H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

1969 Jensen Interceptor MKI BBY 81G 115 3366 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £14,000 - £18,000

JEFF HARRIS: Extensively restored by NUA Motors of Harlow Subtly uprated with a later 4 litre Rover V8 engine and more modern four-speed automatic gearbox Original supplier's plaque and detailed history file Finished in Navy Blue with a Silver roof and sumptuous Italian Cream leather upholstery, this decidedly handsome P5B Coupe has not long emerged from an extensive restoration/upgrade programme designed to make it more usable and enjoyable on today’s roads. Carried out by NUA Motors of Harlow, work included a bare metal bodywork refurbishment and full interior re-trim plus the installation of a more powerful, fuel-injected 4.0 litre Rover V8 and less ponderous four-speed automatic gearbox. Further benefiting from the addition of rear disc brakes, twin electric engine cooling fans and electronic ignition, the four-seater had its brake, suspension and steering assemblies overhauled too. Summed up by the seller as ‘a truly, lovely thing’, this subtly enhanced Rover is worthy of close inspection. Although a marriage of expediency, the union between Rover's stately P5 model range and the ex-Buick 3528cc all-alloy OHV V8 engine resulted in an unexpectedly fine motorcar. Launched in 1967, the Rover P5B (or P5 Buick if you prefer) was conceived to stave off increasingly refined competition from the likes of Jaguar and Mercedes-Benz. Available in Saloon and Coupe guises - both of which employed four doors - the big Rover was equipped with independent torsion-bar front suspension, a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle and disc/drum brakes. Fitted with three-speed automatic transmission and power-assisted steering as standard, it proved a relaxing drive. Though, with some 161bhp and 210lbft of torque on tap, it also boasted a 115mph top speed. Well-appointed in the best Rover tradition, the P5B’s 'gentlemen's club' interior made it a firm favourite with businessmen, politicians (Harold Wilson's car was reputed to have a pipe rack in the back) and even HM The Queen who still owns her Arden Green Saloon. Production lasted until 1973 by which time 9,099 Coupes and 11,501 Saloons had been built. 1969 Rover P5B Coupe AUC 179H 845033360 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £25,000 - £30,000

1969 Triumph TR5 HBH 10G CP2669 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £75,000 - £80,000

1970 Chevrolet C10 Pick-Up EGU 681H C5140A150513 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

1970 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Coupe OBV 9H 1R20652 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £50,000 - £60,000

JEFF HARRIS: 1 of just 776 RHD examples made Matching chassis and engine numbers and never allowed to deteriorate to the point of needing a full restoration Extensive history file dating back to the 1970s Purchased by TV and Radio star Noel Edmonds in 1977 as a gift for his then-wife and formerly registered as 'CIA 7' One of just 776 Series II Roadsters made to right-hand drive specification, chassis 1R1508 was first registered with the Nottingham number plate ‘TAU 465H’ on February 2nd 1970. Resident in Northern Ireland thereafter, the Jaguar was treated to a thorough engine and gearbox overhaul by Oldham & Crowther of Peterborough at an indicated 70,644 miles before being bought by the television and radio star Noel Edmonds as a present for his first wife Gillian during 1978. Checked over by J.R. Etheridge Ltd who looked after Mr Edmonds’ Ford GT40 at the time, the E-Type bore the distinctive number plate ‘CIA 7’. Belonging to Mr C Metcalfe of Milton Keynes by 1984, the two-seater then passed to Paul Conway who kept it for over twenty years. Small bills Garage of Chiswick carried out a full mechanical and body inspection on the car at an indicated 86,171 miles in September 1986 concluding that: ‘Apart from the corroded sills this vehicle is a fine example of a sixteen-year-old motor car’. Minor bodywork restoration and a full respray in its original Red followed during 1990 but, unusually for a home market car, the Series II Roadster has never been allowed to deteriorate to the point of needing total renovation. Thus, it retains its original chassis plate, carburettor position tags and jack bag etc not to mention its factory-fitted engine. Having owned several E-Types in the past and as a veteran of various Concours restorations, the vendor purchased chassis 1R1508 from marque specialist Lanes Cars for £90,000 in 2018 with a view to returning it to showroom condition once more. However, another project intervened and he now feels that someone else should take custodianship. Re-trimmed at some stage, the Jaguar remains presentable and could certainly be enjoyed ‘as is’ especially given that the seller has just spent £1,927.20 with Aldon Automotive of Brierley Hill having the radiator flushed, one cooling fan motor renewed, new coolant hoses fitted, the triple SU carburettors overhauled and electronic ignition added. Starting readily upon inspection and running well during our recent photography session, ‘ABW 88H’ is more authentic than many of the E-Types we encounter. Understood to have covered some 102,000 miles from new, this rare and appealing Series II Roadster is offered for sale with a green logbook (showing Mrs Edmonds’ ownership), old MOTs dating back to 1978 at 76,835 miles, numerous bills, factory hardtop and fitted indoor car cover. Triumphantly unveiled at the 1961 Geneva Motor Show, the Jaguar E-Type created a furore thanks to its supercar performance, stunning looks and modest price tag. Early racing success at the hands of Graham Hill and Roy Salvadori amongst others helped cement the newcomer's reputation. Built as a monocoque with an engine cradling front sub-frame, the E-type's combination of all-around independent suspension and disc brakes allied to rack-and-pinion steering resulted in excellent roadholding and handling capabilities. The indomitable straight-six XK twin-cam engine supplied abundant power. If the design had an Achilles' heel then it was the recalcitrant Moss gearbox. However, Jaguar was quick to correct this shortcoming with a four-speeder of its own design just part of a continual programme of E-Type development that saw the model metamorphose through three Series. Introduced in August 1968, the Series II cars were distinguishable by their revised bumper and light arrangements. Less noticeable was the increased size of the front air intake that in conjunction with dual cooling fans made the Series II better behaved in hot weather and heavy traffic. With its 4235cc engine developing a quoted 265bhp and 283lbft of torque, it was reputedly capable of nearly 150mph and 0-60mph in 7.5 seconds. Available in open two-seater, fixed-head two-seater and fixed-head 2+2-seater guises, the American market accounted for the vast majority of Series II production. Indeed, just 776 of the 8,627 open two-seaters made were to right-hand drive specification. 1970 Jaguar E-Type 4.2 Roadster ABW 88H 1R1508 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £70,000 - £85,000

1970 Lambretta 125cc ABW 177H 221X 006760 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £4,480
JEFF HARRIS: Current ownership since 2007 Offered with a collection of invoices and old MOT's Subject to a previous restoration Of all the now long line of Mercedes SL models, it is the W113 series cars that continue to capture the imagination. With or without the sensuously dished hardtop that graced them with their 'pagoda' nickname, the Paul Bracq designed Roadsters have an understated elegance that demands a second look. This combined with memorable build quality to create one of the great motorcars of the period, the last and most powerful version of which was the 170bhp 280SL launched in 1968. This stunning-looking righthand drive example sports lustrous Blue paintwork complemented by a rich Cream interior trim and is understood to have been restored in the early 2000’s. Having been in current ownership since 2007 ‘KRX716H’ is fitted with a period style Becker Mexico 7948 radio which includes satnav, blue-tooth telephone, MP3 and I-pod connection. Said to be fitted with a higher ration rear axle for improved cruising experience and subject to a gearbox overhaul 10 years ago the SL is offered with both hard and soft tops, collection of old MOT certificates plus invoices from marque specialists Roger Edwards Motors. it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘excellent’ and has a current MoT certificate into March 2022. PLEASE NOTE: By separate negotiation is a hardtop stand, cover and painted spare soft top panel 1970 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL KRX 716H WDB11304422016994 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £70,000 - £80,000

JEFF HARRIS: Reputedly 1 of 238 MKII examples with matching chassis and engine numbers Finished in its original shade of Olive Green Metallic complemented by a Tan leather interior 61,746 miles from new, just one former keeper and subsequent family ownership since 1972 Original handbook, service book, MOT certificates back to 1975 plus a large collection of invoices Subject to an extensive engine overhaul in 2013 by marque specialist Supplied new to the West Midlands and a resident of Worcestershire ever since A very late MKII with ZF 5-speed manual gearbox Subject to a full service plus brake fettling in June of this year Retaining its all-important matching chassis and engine numbers, this last of the line Mk2 DB6 with desirable ZF 5-speed manual gearbox is one of just 238 examples produced (excluding the 38 Volante examples). Attractively finished in its original shade of Olive Green Metallic complemented by a Tan leather interior, ‘EJW 520J’ has covered just 61,746 miles from new in the hands of one former keeper and subsequent family ownership since 1972. Understood to have been purchased new from HR Attwood Ltd of Williamson Street, Wolverhampton by a Mr Roger Turner, resident of the West Midlands, it has remained in the Worcestershire area ever since. Subject to some £40,000 of expenditure with Torque Automotive Engineering in 2008, the engine and differential were overhauled in 2013 by marque specialist David Warburton’s Specialised Automotive Services of Clitheroe, Lancashire when the mileage was recorded as 61,000. Further mechanical fettling also carried out by them at this time included chassis and suspension repairs with the works totalling some £40,000 for which invoices are on file. In June 2021 they were requested to carry out a full service, these works entailing stripping and cleaning of the braking system, changing of fluids including the anti-freeze and brake fluid and replacement of the rocker cover gaskets. A further invoice for this amounting £1280.71 is contained in the history file. Unsurprisingly, the vendor now describes the engine and transmission as “excellent” whilst the paintwork, bodywork and interior are rated as “very good”. Clearly well cared for and offered with its original handbook, service book stamped to 1975, old MoT certificates back to 1975 (at 38227 miles), a large number of invoices and current MoT to August 2022, this highly collectible late model DB6, family owned since 1972 and with just 61,746 miles recorded, is well worthy of the closest inspection. Entering production in July 1969 but not formally unveiled for another month, the rakishly elegant DB6 Mk2 was the ultimate evolution of the iconic Aston Martin DB4/DB5/DB6 line. Sharing the same sheet steel platform chassis as its immediate predecessor complete with all-around coil-sprung suspension (independent double-wishbone front, trailing arm/beam axle rear), four-wheel disc brakes and Armstrong Select-a-ride adjustable rear shock absorbers, the newcomer nevertheless incorporated a host of detail improvements. Sharper and more responsive to drive thanks to wider wire wheels on 6” rims and fatter tyres sourced from the DBS model (hence the need for its trademark flared wheel arches), the Mk2 also benefited from the provision of standard-fit power-assisted rack and pinion steering. Automatic transmission remained a `no cost' option, while cars equipped with the five-speed ZF manual gearbox gained a lower first gear ratio and more positive Borg & Beck clutch. The fabulous Tadek Marek designed 3995cc DOHC straight-six engine could be had with a nascent form of electronic fuel injection. However, most buyers wisely opted for carburettor-fed variants in standard (triple SU, 282bhp) or high-performance Vantage (triple Weber, 325bhp) tune. Indeed, so troublesome did the AE Brico EFI system prove that several Mk2s were converted to Vantage specification by the factory. Revised seating both front and rear meant that the last of the classic DB-series family could also lay claim to being the most comfortable. Only in production until November 1970, just 238 DB6 Mk2 saloons are thought to have been made (of which a mere 122 were reputedly to triple SU carburettor-fed specification). 1971 Aston Martin DB6 Mark 2 EJW 520J DB6MK2/4285/R H&H 8th Sept 2021 £350,000 - £400,000

1971 Jaguar E-Type V12 Coupe Un-Reg 1S72344 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £38,000 - £45,000

JEFF HARRIS: Previously part of the famous Dr James Hull collections and subsequently owned by Jaguar Land Rover Ltd from 2014 to 2019 A rare sunroof model presented in white with contrasting black interior Subject to photographically documented restoration in the 90s The Volkswagen Type 3 was introduced at the 1961 Frankfurt Motor Show and available in two-door notchback, fastback and station wagon variants. The Type 3 diversified Volkswagen’s product range beyond the existing models — the Type 1 (Beetle), Type 14 Karmann Ghia, Type 2 — while retaining their engineering principles, notably the air-cooled engine and the rear-engine, rear-wheel drive layout. A three-door estate (known as the ‘Variant’) was unveiled the following February, with the two-door ‘Fastback’ (or TL) going on sale by 1965 – with the Type 3’s engine being uprated to 1584cc and twin carburettors at the same time. GMY 195 was previously part of the famous Dr James Hull collection, and so was subsequently purchased by Jaguar Land Rover LTD in 2014 and in their ownership for some 5 years. Presented in white with contrasting black interior and featuring a rare sunroof, this vehicle was restored in the 90s with photographic history. The vendor rates the condition of the paintwork as ‘Average’, the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment and transmission as ‘Good’, and the interior trim as ‘Excellent’. GMY 195 is offered with a collection of invoices, previous MOTs and the v5 document which shows 7 former keepers. 1971 Volkswagen 1600E Variant GMY 195J 3412236987 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

1972 Honda CL350 HHR 770K CL3505026532 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £3,920
JEFF HARRIS: Current ownership since 2015 Subject to a gearbox overhaul in 2014 Offered with a collection of invoices and old MOT's Converted from a coupe to a roadster in the early 1990s This desirable manual transmission V12 is understood to have been restored and converted from a coupe in the early 1990s at which time the odometer was reset. Although no invoices are present for the conversion it was clearly carried out to a high standard and the car looks resplendent with its red coachwork, black interior, and chrome wire wheels. Indeed, it has since won numerous prizes including the Bugatti Owner’s Club ‘Scuderia Prize’ and ‘Best in Show’ at a Jaguar Enthusiasts Club Isle Of Man Tour. Whilst in the hands of previous owners it was treated to engine works by Chequered Flag in 2011 and a gearbox overhaul at a cost of £4500 in 2014. Acquired by the vendor in 2015, more recent attention has included the fitment of a new electronic distributor cap and rotor arm in July this year. Offered with a collection of invoices, old MoTs dating back to 1993, original operating manual and sales and service book. ‘BJA325K’ is, in our opinion, sensibly priced when compared to the values of restored original examples with the vendor currently rating the paintwork, bodywork and interior as “good” with “very good” engine plus transmission and is offered with an MOT certificate into July 2022. By 1971, Jaguar's jaw-dropping E-Type had been in production for a decade. Despite continual improvements, new emissions legislation in the all-important American market threatened to strangle the big cat's performance. Jaguar responded by giving its revered sportscar fresh claws in the shape of a 5343cc V12 developed from the stillborn XJ13 Le Mans project car. The new engine was both effortlessly powerful and eerily refined. "The turbine-like smoothness with which the engine provides a sustained shove in the back is almost uncanny, the more so when one accelerates hard in top gear without even a gearchange to interrupt one's headlong dash into the distance" (Autocar 5th July 1973). 1972 Jaguar E-Type V12 BJA325K 1S51021 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £60,000 - £65,000

JEFF HARRIS: Single-family ownership (father and son) until acquisition by the current owner in 2018 Genuine 16,574 miles from new, and condition to match. Original ‘Bookpack’ includes service book, owners handbook, warranty car, etc Truly outstanding ‘timewarp’ example, with serious Concours potential Definitely, a case of ‘the car will speak for itself!’ Introduced in 1968, Mercedes-Benz’s ‘New Generation’ W114/115 models (otherwise known as the /8 series) were intended to attract new buyers to the marque and hence broaden its customer base. Typically well-engineered, they featured all-round, independent coil-sprung suspension and four-wheel disc brakes together with revised manual and four-speed automatic transmissions. Towards the upper end of the W114 range, the 250 was powered by a 2778cc SOHC six-cylinder engine that developed some 128bhp and 159lbft of torque. Reputedly capable of 109mph, the Stuttgart factory's legendary build quality helped make it a strong sales success. Described as ‘a truly outstanding example with serious concours potential’, ‘GKL 245L’ is warranted to have covered just 16,600 miles from new. A real ‘timewarp’ machine, it was in single family ownership (father and son) until being acquired by the vendor during 2018. Finished in White with contrasting Green MB-Tex upholstery, the four-door saloon is rated by the seller as being in ‘very good’ (bodywork, paintwork, automatic gearbox, electrical equipment, engine) or ‘excellent’ (interior trim) condition. Retaining its factory-fitted M130 2.8 litre straight-six powerplant there can be few – if any – comparable UK-supplied W114 cars left. Said to be ‘a car that very much speaks for itself’, this extraordinary Mercedes-Benz is offered for sale with original book pack comprising its service book, owner’s manual and warranty card etc. 1972 Mercedes-Benz 250 Saloon GKL 245L 11401122025370 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £15,000 - £18,000

JEFF HARRIS: Highly sought after V8 Conversion with Heritage shell Subject to restoration between 1992 and 1994 at a cost of nearly £21,000 Subject to over £7600 worth of work since 2018 Introduced in 1962, the MGB Roadster enjoyed an eighteen-year production run. With nicely balanced handling and a good turn of speed, it merited the old MG marketing slogan 'Safety Fast'. Based around a monocoque chassis featuring independent coil-sprung front suspension and a leaf-sprung 'live' rear axle, its 1798cc 'B' series four-cylinder engine was allied to four-speed manual transmission. Capable of over 100mph, the provision of front disc brakes and rack-and-pinion steering greatly aided control. Finished in Tartan Red with Black upholstery, ‘JMA 64K’ was subject to an extensive restoration and upgrade programme between 1992 and 1994 that saw it fitted with a brand-new Heritage bodyshell, Rover 3.5 litre V8 engine and five-speed manual gearbox. Completed some 12,500 miles ago, the work cost nearly £21,000. Further improved since entering the current ownership during February 2018, we are informed that over £7,600 has been spent on suspension polybushes, parabolic springs, a re-cored aluminium radiator with larger cooling fan, overhauled carburettors, a gearbox refurbishment, top-end engine work (skimmed cylinder heads etc) and the installation of adjustable electric power steering etc. The vendor rates the condition of the MG’s bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, gearbox and interior trim all as ‘very good’. ‘JMA 64K’ comes accompanied by its V5 Registration Document and numerous receipts / invoices for its 1990s restoration and more recent work. 1972 MG B V8 Roadster JMA 64K GHN5-294655G H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £20,000

1973 BMW 3.0 CS FAJ 133L 2212097 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £32,000

H&H Auctions: 1 of just 74 Spike Anderson cars 84,700 credible miles recorded Offered with a large collection of invoices Subject to an extensive restoration in 2009 Responsible for building several highly successful Z-based racers during the 1970s including Win Percy’s famous ‘Big Sam’, Spike Anderson soon became a legend in Datsun circles. Indeed, so coveted are the limited number of road cars he converted to ‘Super Samuri’ specification that they have spawned numerous imitators. Their gas flowed cylinder heads, GDS flamespray six-branch exhaust manifolds, uprated suspension, vented front disc brakes with four-pot callipers and stainless-steel sill covers etc are all easy enough to copy. However, the fact remains that there were only ever 74 genuine ‘Super Samuris’ with the sale car being one of them. Fed by triple Dellorto carburettors and exhaling via a stainless-steel exhaust, the engine was stripped and overhauled not long before ‘GAW 105M’ entered the current ownership in 2009. Covering some 2,000 miles since then, the straight-six is said to be in ‘excellent shape with great oil pressure and no leaks or rattles’. Treated to an oil and filter change during 2019, its carburettors were tuned and electronic ignition added at the same time. The vendor has gone through the mechanics and currently rates the five-speed gearbox as ‘excellent’, the brakes as ‘very strong’ and the steering as ‘pin sharp’. Having commissioned Carisma Body Tech Ltd of Colechester to cosmetically restore the Datsun, he considers its bodywork and paintwork to be ‘excellent’ too. Believed but not warranted to have covered some 84,000 miles from new (with old MOTs on file dating back to 2000 at 80,642 miles), this fabulous Super Samuri is accompanied by a letter from Spike Anderson confirming its authenticity, original sales brochure, V5C Registration Document and collection of invoices. 1973 Datsun 240 Z Super Samuri GAW 105M HS30102499 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £50,000 - £60,000

1973 De Tomaso Pantera VNP 653L THPNUY04621 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £60,000 - £70,000

JEFF HARRIS: Supplied new to America and resident in Florida for many years before being imported to the UK during 1989 at an indicated 18,000 miles Converted to right-hand drive and initially British road registered as '2 EXH', matching chassis and engine numbers Pleasingly retains much of its original Cinnamon leather upholstery and currently displays a credible but unwarranted 36,000 miles Supplied new to America, chassis 1S74837 is understood to have covered just 18,000 miles in the hands of one Floridian owner before being repatriated during 1989. First UK road registered as ‘2 EXH’, the Jaguar was still showing a mere 19,000 miles when it appeared at an H&H Buxton auction in 1997. Sadly, the corroborating paperwork has been lost over time but the substantially original interior is consistent with a low mileage car that has spent time in a hot climate. The Cinnamon leather remains presentable aside from a small tear in the driver’s seat. Repainted from Sable to Red at some stage (most likely when it first came to Britain and was converted to right-hand drive), the E-Type has self-evidently been the subject of past restoration work. Starting readily upon inspection, the 2+2-seater shows a highly credible but unwarranted 36,000 miles to its odometer. Riding on chrome wire wheels, it is rated by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (engine, interior trim) or ‘very good’ (bodywork, paintwork, automatic transmission, electrical equipment) condition. Offered for sale with Jaguar Heritage Trust Certificate, V5C Registration Document, sundry paperwork and fitted indoor car cover. Last, of the line, the Jaguar E-type Series III was introduced in 1971. Longer, wider and more comfortable than its predecessors, the newcomer blurred the lines between sports car and grand tourer. Powered by a turbine-smooth all-alloy SOHC 5343cc V12 engine allied to either Jaguar four-speed manual or Borg-Warner three-speed automatic transmission, the refined manner in which it performed (contemporary road tests spoke of 0-60mph in 6.4 seconds and 150mph) simply blew road testers away. Benefiting from a broader track, ventilated disc brakes, power-assisted rack and pinion steering and Lucas transistorized ignition, the Series III was visually distinguished by its 'egg-crate grille, flared wheel arches and purposeful quad-exhaust pipes. Available in fixed-head coupe (2+2-seater) or roadster (2-seater) guises, it remained in volume production until 1974 (though, a special commemorative run of forty-nine black-painted roadsters was released the following year) 1973 Jaguar E-Type V12 Coupe T.B.A UD 1S74837BW H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £50,000

1973 JPS 356 A Coupe Evocation BRZ 353 1132038724 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £32,000

JEFF HARRIS: Treated to a bodywork restoration and overhaul of its brake and suspension systems by marque specialist Overton Coachworks from 1988-1991 Very sparingly used over the last thirty years covering a mere 8,000 miles or so Fitted with a very rare factory sunroof and air conditioning Offered for sale with a 'no advisories' MOT valid until August 2022 A true testament to the quality of the work carried out by Rolls-Royce & Bentley specialist Overton Vehicle Overhauls of Rayleigh (www.bentleyboys.com), ‘SPD 637L’ remains highly presentable following a bare metal bodywork restoration they carried out on it in 1988! As well as banishing any corrosion, they leaded all the joints, renewed all the rubbers and glass and even overhauled the rare factory-fitted sunroof. Overton were also tasked with refinishing the wood veneers and thoroughly overhauling the brake and suspension systems since when a mere 9,000 or so miles have been covered (the last major invoice for suspension fettling being issued on 15th March 1991 at an indicated (1)16,717 miles). MOT tested on 15th November 2000 at an indicated (1)21,998 miles, the Rolls-Royce’s odometer presently shows less than (1)26,000 miles. Acquired by its last registered keeper in late October 2001 and given a rustproof treatment the following year, ‘SPD 637L’ has been well stored despite its lack of use. Inspected by Brain Page MIMI of Classic Assessments last year, he concluded thus: ‘All in all, a nice example of its type’ and valued the car at up to £18,500. Felt by the seller to drive ‘very well’ following some light recommissioning, this delightful Silver Shadow passed its last MOT on 13th August 2021 with ‘no advisories’. 1973 Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow SPD 637L SRH15394 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

JEFF HARRIS: Recently subject to full restoration at a cost amounting to some £9,250 Presented in Jaguar Mineral metallic red with black interior and red piping Offered with 76,912 recorded miles on the odometer Introduced in 1965, the MGB GT was a more comfortable and versatile proposition than its roadster sister. With a top speed of over 100mph courtesy of its 1798cc B-series engine and a capable chassis featuring independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering and disc / drum brakes, the enclosed 2+2-seater merited the old MG marketing slogan 'Safety Fast'. Manufactured in 1975, LCG 338N has recently been subject to full restoration and is presented in Jaguar Mineral metallic red with black interior and red piping. The total cost of the restoration amounted to some £9,250 and included a full window-out respray, as well as replacement wheels and tyres, fuel pump, alternator, distributor, temperature gauge, headlights, windscreen, petrol tank, battery, master cylinder, steering wheel, carpets, dashboard, front and rear screen mouldings, chrome bumpers and finishings, front grille, front indicators and rear side panels. The odometer displays 76,912 miles and the vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission and interior trim all as ‘Excellent’. 1975 MG B GT LCG 338N GHDS-374239G H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

1975 Yamaha TZ350 Un-Reg 383-992080 Historics 17th July 2021 £11,000 - £15,000 £15,848
JEFF HARRIS: One of fewer than 2000 Bentley T1s produced, presented in Seychelles Blue complementing dark blue leather interior, dark blue carpet and grey headlining. Offered with documents including a copy of the built sheet, dealer invoice and delivery note, as well as the manufacturer history book consisting of copies of inspection reports throughout the build process of the car. As well as this, a number of invoices totalling nearly £27,000 Subject to over £6000 in expenditure since October of 2019 By 1965, Rolls-Royce was well-practised in the art of badge engineering and, while the new T Series Bentley was aimed at the world's many devotees of the 'Flying B' logo, it was essentially a re-badged version of the Silver Shadow. Its arrival was none too soon however and, together with the Shadow, did much to reverse the notion that Rolls-Royce was falling behind the times. It certainly resulted in many firsts for the company, including unitary construction rather than separate body/chassis units, disc rather than drum brakes and independent rear suspension. Though 7in shorter and 3.5in narrower than the Bentley S3 it replaced, the John Polwhele Blatchley-penned T1 nevertheless possessed greater space for both luggage and passengers and boasted far more contemporary looks. At launch, it was powered by a 172bhp V8 engine of 6230cc, though this was enlarged to 6750cc during 1970. Early cars employed the same GM automatic transmission as the S3, but this was superseded by the Turbo Hydramatic system from 1970 onwards. The car's famed 'magic carpet ride was achieved courtesy of a high-pressure hydraulic system licensed from Citroen. Initially, it featured self-levelling at both ends, but this was deleted from the front in 1969. Fewer than 2000 Bentley T1s were sold, which makes this example a much rarer and more exciting proposition. TXC 258P was manufactured in 1975 and was sold via Appleyard Rippon Ltd to a JJ Thompson Ltd of Stockton-on-Tee on 04 February 1976, at the time presented in Seychelles Blue over Shell Grey with complementing dark blue leather interior, dark blue carpet and grey headlining. Still presented in Seychelles Blue, albeit fully, but also retaining its original interior combination, TXC 258P has in more recent years been looked after and sold through Hanwells of London; benefiting from a service including cleaning and re-sealing of the rear height control restrictors in July of 2020, as well as having had nearly £5,500 spent in October of 2019, where the car was serviced, rear levelling system was set up, rear suspension overhauled, carburettors calibrated and some corrosion rectified at the base of the doors. The odometer currently displays 75,882 unwarranted miles. Included with the vehicle unusually is a copy of the built sheet, dealer invoice, new car order form, delivery note, warranty and manufacturer history book including copies of inspection reports throughout the build process of the car. As well as this, a number of invoices totalling nearly £27,000. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission and gearbox and interior trim all as ‘Excellent’. 1976 Bentley T1 TCX 258P SBH23904 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £15,000 - £18,000

1976 Mercedes-Benz 350 SL OLX 486P 10704322012430 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £15,000 - £18,000

JEFF HARRIS: 73,315 miles from new and current ownership since 1997 Offered with a collection of invoices, old MOT's and Tax discs Vantage bodywork with fliptail Matching numbers with 'S' series engine Last serviced at 73,192 miles at the cost of £5,949.46 Retrospectively known as the ‘Series 3’, the redesigned V8 model Aston Martin was phased-into production during July 1973 and was a response to concerns over forthcoming US emission control regulations. Marking a switch from Bosch fuel-injection to quad twin-choke 42mm Weber carburation, the newcomer was visually distinguished by an enlarged air intake, an elegant, elongated bonnet ‘power-bulge’ and an altered rear window base panel. The ‘Series 3’ utilised the same steel platform chassis as its predecessor, complete with independent double-wishbone front suspension, a Watts linkage-located de Dion rear axle, power assisted rack-and-pinion steering. The luxury GT benefitted from improved engine and transmission cooling and a revised petrol tank design, which boosted luggage space. Other improvements included a revamp of the 2+2 interior with revised seats and rearranged switchgear. Initially developing some 310bhp, its cleaner-running and less temperamental 5340cc DOHC V8 engine made for a prodigiously fast motor car. By 1977, however, even tighter emission regulations had sapped peak output to around 280bhp. Aston's response was to install 'Stage 1' camshafts and an exhaust system developed for the V8 Vantage, restoring power to nearer 304bhp. Models so equipped are sometimes referred to as V8 'S'. Due to financial difficulties, the 967 Series 3 cars commissioned were produced in two phases: July 1973 – December 1874 and Spring 1976 – October 1978. A rare and desirable original RHD home market V8 'S', chassis V811772RCAS is fitted with full ‘fliptail’ Vantage bodywork. Ordered with the special ‘S’ series engine this is an all-matching numbers car. Specified with the 3-speed automatic transmission the vendor tells us that it has a shift kit fitted. Presented with a Dark Blue body ‘YEL827S’ was last subjected to a body and chassis restoration in 1998. Inside, this ‘S’ has a cabin trimmed in Beige leather with complementing dark blue piping. Carpet footwell over mats are in matching blue over the fitted beige carpet. The cabin has been treated to front seat headrests with cushions. At some stage later electric door mirrors have been a practical addition by a previous custodian of the car. This ‘S’ was first registered in October 1977 and has been in its current ownership for 24 years, since 1997 and has covered 73,317 miles from new. The most recent service was carried out at 73,192 miles in 2018 and at a cost of £5,949.46. As part of maintenance, a new battery was fitted in March of 2021. There is a collection of receipts and invoices for work carried out and maintenance that the car has had in its ownership. The current MoT expires on August 3rd, 2022. Further to the car’s specification, an immobiliser has been fitted for added security. A jack and toolkit are present, as is a cover for the car. As part of the maintenance and care and attention to this Aston, some 20 years ago the engine had been subject to some work conducive to effective running of the car on unleaded fuel. The ‘S’ wears recent Avon 235/70/R15 tyres which were fitted at the last service, 123 miles ago. The old MoT certificates are present with the car and date back to 1987, these are in addition to a selection of spent tax discs. The vendor has taken the opportunity to grade the car as excellent with regards to the bodywork, engine, excellent, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission, gearbox and interior trim. 1977 Aston Martin V8 'S YEL 827S V811772RCAS H&H 8th Sept 2021 £80,000 - £90,000

JEFF HARRIS: Presented in Red with a contrasting black interior and features a new hood Offered with a desirable manual gearbox with overdrive on 3rd and 4th Subject to mechanical recommissioning c. 3 years ago and stored since Introduced in June 1970, the Triumph Stag was conceived as a luxury convertible sports car to rival the likes of the R107-series Mercedes-Benz SL. As such, it came equipped with electric windows, power-assisted rack and pinion steering, and servo-backed disc/drum brakes as standard. Based around a two-door monocoque bodyshell (stylist Giovanni Michelotti had physically shortened a pre-production Triumph 2000 saloon to fashion the initial prototype), the newcomer featured all-around independent suspension (McPherson strut front / semi-trailing arm rear) and a well laid-out 2+2 cabin. Neatly integrated, the substantial roll-over hoop that joined the B-pillars gained extra strength from a T-bar link to the windscreen frame. With some 145bhp and 167lbft of torque on tap from its bespoke 2997cc SOHC V8 engine, the model was reputedly capable of 120mph. Available with a choice of four-speed manual or three-speed automatic transmission all but the earliest Stags benefited from both hard- and soft-top roofs. Despite being in production for seven years during which time 25,877 cars were made, a mere 9,500 or so are thought to have survived. Presented in Red with contrasting black interior, PJB 610R benefits from a desirable manual gearbox with overdrive on 3rd and 4th and is offered having been stored for 3 years after a mechanical recommissioning. The vehicle has been subject to an overhauled brake system, replacement wheels, and a new hood and is offered with a small number of previous MOTs as well as the v5 document. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, and interior trim as ‘Good’, with the transmission and gearbox ‘Very Good’. 1977 Triumph Stag PJB 610R LD438450 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

1977 Triumph Stag URH 949R LD42468A H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: A superb example of the little known ERRA Mondial 500, the brainchild of Stan Daniels Reputedly one of just twelve made and great fun to drive Correctly registered with the DVLA as an ERRA Mondial 500 (registered 1978) Inspired by Italian sports racers of the type which distinguished themselves on the Mille Miglia, Targa Florio and at the Le Mans 24-hours etc, enthusiast Stan Daniels decided to build his own tribute in the late 1980s. The level of craftsmanship which went into the resultant ‘SD 500’ was such that Gerry Hawkridge of Transformer Cars (and more recently Hawk Cars) offered to put the design into (very) limited production. Based around a tubular steel spaceframe chassis equipped with independent front suspension, a De Dion rear axle with Watts linkage and disc brakes, the two-seater was powered by a 2-litre DOHC Alfa Romeo engine allied to a five-speed transaxle. Bodied in fibreglass but with aluminium detailing to fool the casual observer, the ‘SD 500’ was a singularly pretty car. Great fun to drive with a decent power to weight ratio, just twelve are thought to have been built with the later cars branded as ERRAs (Elmsett Road Racing Automobiles). Registered with the DVLA as a 1978 ERRA Mondial 500, chassis 001024 has been in the current ownership since 2011. Looking every inch the 1950s sports racer thanks to its ‘9289 RO’ number plate and the presence of various aluminium panels including the bonnet, the two-seater is described by the vendor as being in ‘good’ (1962cc Alfa Romeo engine, electrical equipment, manual gearbox) or ‘very good’ (bodywork, paintwork, interior trim) condition. A highly convincing, well-made and nicely detailed evocation that is worthy of close inspection. Offered for sale with a V5C Registration Document and paperwork file recording previous ownership details, old MOTs and sundry magazine article reprints etc 1978 ERRA Mondial 500 9289 RO #001024 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £60,000 - £70,000

1978 Maserati Merak SS TAO 993S AM122/AUS2288 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £60,000 - £70,000

1979 Austin Morris Mini 95 Pick-Up FVO 26V XKU1-652168A H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

JEFF HARRIS: Stalled restoration project offered with parts to complete £100,000 understood to have been expended since purchase in 2017 Engine overhauled with Edelbrock heads and Holley carburetor New gearbox (original unit included) and new stainless exhaust Always a company that followed a policy of progressive and gradual refinement of its models, masterfully led by Tony Crook, the Bristol company frequently employed novel solutions taken from its experience in aircraft design, especially in the area of ergonomics. This 'stand apart' approach to body design, coupled with the reliable melodious power of Chrysler US V8 engines and impeccable build quality has ensured the cars continue to appeal to a more discerning type of clientele. Introduced in 1975 as a replacement for the long-running 411, the 412 was notable as Bristol’s first convertible model since the 1950s. Styled by (and initially crafted by) Carrozzeria Zagato of Milan, its conspicuously angular two-door bodywork featured a pronounced central rollover bar. With a detachable Targa panel upfront and a folding rear section, the newcomer’s two-part roof proved both practical and versatile. Initially powered by a 6556cc (Series I) and later a 5898cc (Series 2) Chrysler OHV V8 engine allied to Torqueflite automatic transmission, the 412 was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 7.4 seconds and 140mph. The Series 2 models also benefited from enhanced ventilation systems, redesigned seats, and 10,000-mile service intervals. Hand-built to special order; the 2+2 convertible remained in production until 1982 by which time less than 100 are thought to have been sold. Supplied new to its first owner, a Mr. Frame of Watford, and registered on 4 May 1979 under the mark DLW 2T, this Series 2 Convertible was originally finished in Pegasus Blue with a red leather interior. Owned for the first time by the vendor in the 1980s and used for several Continental trips whilst in his ownership it subsequently passed through the hands of a Doctor amongst others before being repurchased by him in 2017. The previous owner had spent a not inconsiderable amount of time and money on the car whilst in his care; including the sourcing of a brand-new gearbox and torque converter, an extensive engine overhaul around the original block by a Mopar specialist, and various structural repairs. Following its acquisition, the vendor used the car briefly before deciding to restore it properly and we are advised that in excess of c.£100,000 has been spent since 2018. The project now requires finishing and we understand most, if not all, parts are included to complete the work. The overhauled and running engine features Edelbrock heads (the originals are included as spares as is the original gearbox and torque converter), all structural work is believed to have been completed, the car rewired, new stainless exhaust fitted and the seats retrimmed in a red hide. A further quantity of matching hide is included to assist in trimming the remainder of the interior. This interesting and rare project is accompanied by a detailed history file which includes an original 412 instruction manual, original sales brochures, a copy of the original bill of sale, details of its early history with Bristol Cars, expired MoTs, correspondence, invoices, old photographs, DVLA previous keepers record, and detailed spreadsheets of works completed since 2018. The car is available for viewing prior to the auction in Surrey 1979 Bristol 412 [Extensive Restoration Required] FND 104T 7846147Z H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

1979 Ferrari 308 GTB T.B.A 24093 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £50,000

JEFF HARRIS: Supplied new to America and in one family ownership until imported to the United Kingdom in 2021 Just 34,707 (atoc) recorded miles Understood to have been stored off the road from 2004 following the passing of the first owner Subject to much mechanical recommissioning work in 2021 Supplied with original stamped service book and NOVA certificate for registration with first recorded UK keeper Nicknamed 'der Panzerwagen' by Mercedes-Benz's own development engineers, the R107-series was more structurally rigid than some contemporary saloons! Introduced in 1971, the Convertible was styled by Friedrich Geiger whose other credits included the 540K, 300SL (W198) Gullwing and W113 Pagoda. Always more of a grand tourer than an out and out sports car, the vast majority were specified with automatic transmission. Powered by a 4520cc SOHC V8 engine, the 450SL model was quoted as developing some 225bhp and 278lbft of torque. A strong 120mph-plus performer, it remained in production until 1980. This 450 SL was manufactured in 1979 and supplied new to the United States of America being delivered in November 1979. Fitted with the 4520cc SOHC V8 engine with automatic transmission, the Mercedes-Benz is finished in White with Black interior upholstery. The R107 has a recorded mileage of just 34,707 miles (at time of consignment) and was in one family ownership in the United States until being imported into the United Kingdom in 2021, currently un-registered the SL has a NOVA certificate for registering the 450 SL with the first registered UK keeper. Understood to have been dry-stored off the road from 2004 until 2021 following the passing of the original owner, remaining there throughout the ownership of his widow. Subject to much recommissioning work in 2021 which comprised new fuel pump, spark plugs and HT leads, distributor, tie rods, drop links, and new tires (with the previous 1983 ones included with the car). The 450 SL was also provided with servicing, pressure testing and fuel injection calibration. The R107 is offered with the original handbook and stamped service book, aforementioned NOVA certificate, bill of landing and previous state title. Pleasingly retaining the original Becker radio cassette, hard-top stand and cover, original Mercedes tool kit and first aid kit and spare wheel. Fitted with a soft-top in Black and body-coloured hard-top. 1979 Mercedes-Benz 450 SL Un-Reg 10704412058475 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £20,000 - £24,000

1979 Triumph TR7 30th Anniversary ETH 403V TCT/115347-UCF H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: 53,200 recorded and credible miles and just 5 former keepers shown on the V5c 1 of just 421 LE roadsters made to mark the end of the line for home market MGBs New Mohair hood and last serviced in 2018 plus history file The production of 1,000 LE's (421 Roadsters/579 GTs) in October 1980 marked the end of the line for home market MGBs. The LE (ie Limited Edition) Roadsters were all finished in Metallic Bronze, trimmed in Orange/Brown cloth and featured distinctive Gold stripes on their flanks, Triumph Stag-style alloy wheels and deep front spoilers. The price tag was £6,445, for which you received a very well-sorted two-seater sports car. They have inevitably become collectible, and the very smart 1981 example offered was supplied new by F.W Cuffs and Co of Chipping Campden. The credible but unwarranted odometer reading – currently 53,200 miles – is thought to represent the total covered from new. Only five former keepers are shown on the V5C Registration Document and the MG comes complete with copies of its service records plus a collection of old MOT certificates and invoices. Having received a new Mohair hood and last serviced in 2018, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’ and is offered with an MOT certificate into July 2022. 1981 MG B LE Roadster PAD 267W GVADJ1AG522711 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £13,000 - £15,000

JEFF HARRIS: A truly exceptional example which even retains the factory stickers on its seat belt tongues! Extensive history file includes the Pre Delivery Inspection Report, first MOT certificate and original service invoices etc Ziebart treated when new with a glorious, untouched interior Arguably the most complete grand tourer of its generation, the XJ-S's ride / handling balance remains impressive to this day. Fitted with nicely damped coil-sprung suspension, power-assisted rack and pinion steering and potent four-wheel disc brakes, elements of its design were bequeathed to both the Jaguar XK8 and Aston Martin DB7. Though, sadly neither inherited its legendary 5343cc V12 engine. Rated at 295bhp and 320lbft of torque in its later guises, this superlative unit was mated to three-speed automatic transmission as standard. Said to be capable of 150mph and 0-60mph in less than eight seconds, for many the ultimate XJS variant remains the first series V12 Coupe. This XJ-S is truly exceptional. Not only has the Jaguar been in single family ownership and covered a mere 17,000 miles from new but it also exhibits a rare degree of originality both in terms of the vehicle itself and the accompanying paperwork. How many other thirty-nine year old vehicles have you encountered that still have the original factory stickers present on their seatbelt tongues? Supplied new by Wadham Stringer of Guildford to Mrs Irene Richards, ‘WPE 60Y’ pleasingly retains its original order form, sales invoice, Super Cover document, Ziebart treatment certificate and Pre-Delivery Inspection report. Finished in the gorgeous combination of Sapphire Blue Metallic with Biscuit leather upholstery, the 2+2-seater’s interior remains a delight with a notable lack of wear to the trim and lustrous wood veneers. Sparingly used but well looked after, main dealer service sheets on file are augmented by invoices for a new water pump, hose kit and air-conditioning conversion etc (to more modern R134a refrigerant) not to mention a factory recall for the fuel and ignition systems. Recently recommissioned following a period of inactivity, ‘WPE 60Y’ started readily and ran very well during our recent photography session. Riding on its original starfish alloys, this very special XJ-S would grace any marque collection. 1982 Jaguar XJ-S HE WPE 60Y SAJJNAEW3BC107812 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

1983 Lancia HPE 1600 NST 253Y ZLA828BF000933481 H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: Presented in an attractive combination of white with contrasting blue leather interior interior and matching hood Accompanied with a desirable matching hard top Displays just 77,503 miles and is offered with an MOT certificate valid until 07 July 2022 Successor to the European 350SL and American 450SL models, the (R107) 380SL was introduced in March 1980. Utilising the same two-door monocoque bodyshell equipped with all-round coil-sprung independent suspension (wishbone front / semi-trailing arm rear), power assisted recirculating ball steering and four-wheel disc brakes as its predecessors, the newcomer boasted an enlarged 3839cc SOHC V8 engine and improved four-speed automatic transmission. Presented in an attractive combination of white with contrasting blue leather interior and blue hood, FLE 549Y is a US car imported in 2016 by its current owner and displays 77,503 miles on the odometer. This particular example comes accompanied with a desirable hard top, as well as a number of documents including import docs, a copy of the US title, some previous MOTs and a collection of invoices totalling nearly $9,000. The vendor rates the condition of the interior trim as ‘Average to Good’, the bodywork, engine and electrical equipment as ‘Good’ and the paintwork and transmission as ‘Very Good’. 1983 Mercedes-Benz 380SL FLE 594Y WBDA45A90B0Z4790 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £9,000 - £11,000

1984 Jaguar XJ-SC 3.6 Burberry Special Edition JAG 542Y SAJJNACC7CC116005 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: UK-supplied and right-hand drive example Just 77,167 miles from new (as supported by 16 service entries) Current ownership since 2014 Serviced in 2020 by Classic Mercedes Restoration Offered with a large history file The Mercedes R107-series SL was launched in 1971 to replace the long-lived W113 'Pagoda' SL that first appeared in 1963. Though dispensing with Mercedes' usual model identification, it was based on the suspension of the W114 saloon and ran until 1989 with more than 237,000 examples built, being the longest single series ever produced by Mercedes-Benz except the G-Wagen. The Bruno Sacco-designed car was bigger, heavier and softer-riding than its predecessor, but can still handle and won the plaudits from distinguished motoring writers including LJK Setright. The 245bhp 500SL made from 1980 had an all-alloy fuel-injected V8 and was made for Europe only and with 60mph available in 7.4 secs the top speed was 140mph, faster even than the US, Japan and Australian 560SL. Plenty of R107s (and SLC’s) come to market but 500SLs are still a rarity, with only 11,812 built. Finished in Silver with Red upholstery, ‘B677 BJO’ has covered just 77,167 miles (atoc) from new. The accompanying service book contains sixteen entries (nine main dealers, one marque specialist and six others). Covering a mere 7,000 miles over the last twelve years or so, the 500SL entered the current ownership in 2014. Entrusted to Mercedes-Benz specialist SS Motors of Surrey during 2016, the Convertible received a service, replacement steering shock absorber and new front brake pads/hoses at a cost of c.£1,000. Last serviced by Classic Mercedes Restoration in November 2020, this elegant low mileage 500SL is offered for sale with a large history file containing numerous past invoices, tax discs and old MOTs plus its original handbook/service book and a current ‘no advisories’ MOT certificate valid until October 2021. 1985 Mercedes-Benz 500 SL B677 BJO 1070462A026462 H&H 8th Sept 2021


1986 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL D316 FRF WDB1070412A053432 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £26,000 - £30,000

JEFF HARRIS: Finished in Willow Green 17,900 miles from new Offered with history file The 1988 420 SL now offered is a very tidy-looking example, as well it might be, having been in single family ownership until the seller acquired it and having covered just 17,900 miles from new! It is finished in a pleasing shade of Willow Green that's matched to a Beige leather interior with Dark Brown soft top. The factory codes confirm the fire extinguisher and limited slip differential were specified from new and the Benz comes complete with a colour-keyed factory hard top, plus its original book pack, collection of invoices, pre-delivery check list and a large collection of old MOTs. Subject to some £14,000 of recent recommissioning by a marque specialist the vendor considers the bodywork, paintwork, upholstery, V8 engine plus automatic transmission to all be ‘excellent'. ‘E46 PFD’ is offered with an MOT certificate into July 2022. A fine-looking example of popular breed that's barely yet run in! Mercedes have been producing an SL (Sport Leicht) model or range of models since 1954, when the landmark 300SL was unveiled. The similarly styled, but mechanically unrelated, 190 followed in 1955, completing the first generation of cars. The second generation SL (W113) began with the 230 of 1963. It was distinguished by its lower waistline, big curved screens and a distinctive optional hardtop that earned it the nickname of 'pagoda top'. The larger, third generation model (R107) was launched in 1971. The newcomer featured a two-door monocoque bodyshell with independent suspension all round. Over its very successful 19 year production span the R107 featured no less than two straight-six engines and six V8 units. The 420 SL variant is understood to be the rarest of all the 237,287 R107 SLs made, with just 2,148 leaving the factory between 1985 and 1989. Its 4.2-litre V8 produced some 215bhp at 5200rpm - sufficient output to endow the big Benz with effortless acceleration and a top speed of 130mph, while remaining more economical than its bigger-engined siblings. 1988 Mercedes-Benz 420 SL E46 PFD WDB1070472A082344 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £50,000 - £55,000

1989 BMW 635 CSI High Line T.B.A WBAEC820408188741 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

JEFF HARRIS: Supplied new by Stratstone of Mayfair to the Edwards Furniture Galleries of Battersea Warranted 67,000 miles from new as substantiated by fifteen service stamps (mostly main dealer) Subsequently retailed by Mann Egerton of Norwich whose number plates and rear window sticker it still wears Recently recommissioned and treated to a new mohair hood following ten years' inactivity on a Norfolk estate Launched in 1975, Jaguar's XJ-S was designed to seamlessly blur borders rather than blast down back roads and was equipped with automatic transmission as standard. Though, when fed the quoted 295bhp and 318lbft of torque developed by a post 1981 H.E. (high efficiency) 5.3 litre V12 engine, this still resulted in a claimed top speed of 150mph and 0-60mph in less than eight seconds. Introduced at the 1988 Geneva Motor Show, the long awaited full convertible version featured a reinforced floorpan, frameless doors and sophisticated electric hood (complete with heated glass rear window). Underpinned by the same all-round independent coil-sprung suspension and power assisted rack and pinion steering as its fixed head coupe siblings, the soft-top came with anti-lock brakes as standard. Priced at some £40,000, a waiting list was quick to form. Finished in the handsome combination of Arctic Blue Metallic with Dark Blue leather upholstery, chassis 156679 was supplied new by Stratstone of Mayfair to the Battersea-based Edwards Furniture Galleries. Fifteen stamps in the accompanying service book (mostly main dealer) help warrant the current odometer reading of 67,000 miles. Migrating from London to Norfolk during 1995, the Convertible was retailed by Mann Egerton (Jaguar) of Norwich two years later complete with a warranty; their number plates and rear window sticker still adorn the car. Kept garaged on a Norfolk estate with occasional exercise around the grounds between 2010 and 2020 while its previous (fourth) owner’s health sadly deteriorated, the XJ-S has since been recommissioned. Expensively treated to a new mohair hood in the recent past, the two-seater remains highly presentable. Starting readily and running well during our recent photography session, ‘F356 EVG’ is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good / excellent overall’ condition with regards to its V12 engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, bodywork, paintwork and interior trim. He adds that the Convertible is ‘an excellent driver’. Offered for sale with V5C Registration Document, book pack, sundry paperwork and fresh MOT certificate. 1989 Jaguar XJ-S V12 Convertible F356 EVG SAJJNADW3DA156679 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £16,000 - £20,000

JEFF HARRIS: One of just 4,784 2.5-16s sold worldwide and presented in Smokey Silver with contrasting black leather interior Features the desirable manual gearbox and has been in current ownership for the last 13 years Offered after having had £6,288 on mechanical recommissioning this year alone Unveiled at the 1983 Frankfurt Motor Show, the 190E 2.3-16 was arguably Mercedes-Benz's most driver orientated car since the legendary 300SL `Gullwing'. Flagship of the recently introduced 190 (W201) range, the newcomer had originally been conceived as a potential World Rally Championship contender before morphing into a high-performance road car. For 1988, Mercedes-Benz created the 2.5-16. Engineered in-house, its larger 2498cc unit developed 204bhp @ 6,800rpm and 177lbft of torque. As well as being notably quicker (150mph, 0-60mph in 7.1 seconds), the 2.5-16 achieved considerable success in the prestigious DTM race series. Campaigned by AMG with factory backing, the distinctive sliver and black championship-winning machines netted the last of their 50 victories during 1993. During its four-year production run (1988-1992), just 4,784 2.5-16s were sold worldwide. Presented in Smoke Silver with contrasting Black leather interior, ‘F425 UJN’ features the desirable manual gearbox and has been in the current ownership since 2008. Recommissioned this year following a decade in storage, the Mercedes-Benz had £6,288 spent on it including a new battery, fuel distributor, clutch master / slave cylinders, spark plugs, injectors and brake callipers etc. In addition, the self-levelling rear suspension was fettled and the engine tuned. ‘F425 UJN’ is offered for sale with the original tool kit, spare wheel, owner’s manual, service booklet (the latter carrying sixteen stamps) and old MOT certificates from 1999-2011. The current MOT certificate was issued on March 4th 2021 at an indicated 90,005 miles with ‘no advisories’. The vendor rates the bodywork and paintwork as ‘average’, the gearbox, interior trim and electrical equipment as ‘good’ and the engine as ‘very good’. 1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5-16 Cosworth F425 UJN WBD2010352F585571 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £16,000 - £20,000

1989 Mercedes-Benz 300 SE F993 TRT WDB1260242A437346 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £6,226
JEFF HARRIS: Number 114 of just 120 limited edition examples manufactured In current ownership for the last 18 years and displays just 65,970km (40,991 miles). A rare right hand conversion for a vehicle only supplied in left hand drive By the time the fourth generation of the Alfa Romeo Spider was unveiled, the model had moved considerably upmarket. To attract a new and more image-driven audience, Alfa teamed up with a French magazine called Beauté to launch a more premium-looking variant of the well-known Spider. Offered only on the French market, the Beauté edition was finished in an attractive combination of white and dark blue. To provide a bit of contrast the top was dark blue and the 15-inch Quadrifoglio wheels were painted in white. The white and blue motif was carried out to the interior, where the seats were upholstered in white leather and the carpet was blue. The door panels were partly covered in the same white leather that was found on the seats. The dashboard, the steering wheel and the center console were black. No modifications were made under the hood and the Spider Beauté was powered by Alfa’s famed chain-driven 2L four-cylinder engine paired with a five speed manual transmission that sent power to the rear wheels. Only 120 examples of the Beauté were built in 1991. Each one was identified by a numbered plaque that was mounted to the right of the clock on the center console. Number 114 of those 120 examples, L676 XAT was manufactured in 1991 and imported to the UK through Ellison of Hull with delivery mileage. The car was registered in 1993 and at some point it is believed to have been converted from left to right hand drive. More recently, the car has been subject to work in February of 2021 including the sills being repaired, boot floor replaced, the lower half of the car resprayed and the underside waxyoiled, as well as a replacement battery in October of 2020 and replacement starter motor in August of 2021. L676 XAT has been in current ownership for a staggering 12 years and displays 65,970km (40,991 miles). Accompanied with the car are documents including the V5 document which displays 4 former keepers, MOT certificates straight through from 1996 to present, a collection of invoices and even includes a record of petrol that has been put in the car during current ownership. The vendor rates the condition of the transmission and gearbox as ‘Good’, the bodywork as ‘Good to Very Good’ and the engine, electrical equipment and paintwork as ‘Very Good’. 1991 Alfa Romeo Spider 'Beauté' L676 XAT ZAR11500006012582 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: Presented in Balmoral Green with contrasting Parchment hide interior with Spruce Green accents Displays 84,188 warranted miles and just 3 former keepers on the v5 document Includes original service book and continuation book containing 25 stamps, 21 previous MOT Certificates and invoices totalling some £46,000 The Continental R (code-named ‘Nepal’ by the engineering department) was designed and built entirely at Crewe. This was a significant change from previous Continentals that were offered out to coachbuilders to complete, although Mulliner Park Ward was involved in developing the body shape. The Continental R filled the space left by the Carmargue, sharing with that model an eye-watering list price. When launched in 1991, the initial press release had the price as £160,000, only for that to be tweaked upwards soon afterwards to £175,000, when the new VAT rate was announced in that year’s budget. The sleek shape had more than a nod to a more modern Bentley, to an exciting future, rather less obviously classic, and benefitted from work in the wind tunnel; the windscreen was raked to lower the vehicle’s drag coefficient, enhancing fuel consumption, lowering wind noise and raising the model’s top speed. It is said that when the model was unveiled at the Geneva Motor Show, the assembled audience broke out into spontaneous applause. The Continental R sat on 16-inch wheels and low profile Avon tyres raised to 17 inches in 1994. Powered by the company’s revered 6750cc V8 engine, now using a new four-speed GM automatic transmission, the 325bhp turbocharged power unit would offer a near 150mph top speed and somehow heave Bentley’s 2.4-tonne bulk to 60mph in just over six seconds. Manufactured in 1993 and delivered new via Charles Hurst Ltd of Belfast, K624 JWJ is presented in Balmoral Green with contrasting Parchment hide interior and Spruce Green accents. Displaying just 84,188 miles ATOC and just 3 former keepers on the v5 document, K624 JWJ has been in current ownership for the last 7 years. The vehicle has been looked after by Colbrook of Peterborough since 2011, with the most recent service on 27 July 2021. At this time, the vehicle also received an MOT, which is valid until 28 July 2022. Included is a full vehicle specification list, original service book and continuation book containing 25 stamps, 21 previous MOT Certificates and invoices totalling some £46,000. The vendor rates the condition of the interior trim as ‘Very Good, with the Bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork and transmission and gearbox as ‘Excellent’. Please note the personalised registration 'OVS 354' is not included with the vehicle, but is available by separage negotiation 1993 Bentley Continental R K624 JWJ SCBZB63AXWCH42195 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £32,000

1993 Daimler Double Six K899HHP SAJDKALW3AP663638 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £11,000 - £13,000

1993 Jaguar XJS 4.0 'Hatchback' 30 OXJ SAJJNAED3EJ189748 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £16,000 - £20,000

1994 Triumph Trophy 4 1200 M223 RWL SMTTC345CSR016614 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £2,574
1995 MG RV8 M790 TAB SARRAWBMBMG001255 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £18,000 - £22,000

JEFF HARRIS: A great opportunity for a collector - just one owner from new and only 66,460 warranted miles Presented in Mystic Blue Pearl with anniversary interior Offered with documents including the original new vehicle order form and spec sheet, bookpack including service book, MOTs through from 1999 to 2018 and more As its name would suggest, this was a Mk3 Golf special edition was made to celebrate 20 years of VW’s GTi model. Precisely 1,000 were made in three- and five-door guise with special chequered Recaro seats, red seatbelts, half-chrome and leather golf ball gear knob, and red stitching for the steering wheel and handbrake gaiter. The red theme continued on the piping for the floor mats and brake calipers. It also sported 16×7 split rim BBS alloys, similar to those found on the VR6. Offered in Mystic Blue Pearl with contrasting anniversary interior, P224 GAV is a very rare opportunity to acquire a car with just one owner from new and 66,460 warranted miles. This particular example boasts an impressive specification including both electric sunroof and air conditioning which are unusual together, as well as power heated wing mirrors, factory mud flaps, stereo upgrade and floor mats, which are still present. Included with the sale are equally appealing documents including the original new vehicle order form and spec sheet, as well as the original bookpack including service book, MOTs straight through from 1999 to 2018 when the car was put into storage, a collection of previous invoices, spare key and V5 document which displays zero previous owners. 1996 Volkswagen Golf GTI Anniversary P224 GAV WVWZZZ1HZVW144398 H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: 66,000 miles from new Offered with 2 keys, tool kit, handbook and recently shod with new front tyres Cherished registration number 'M1 VTG' included in the sale Although Victor Gauntlett had long mooted the idea, it took the arrival of Ford money and TWR Group know-how for a new generation, 'small' Aston Martin to become a reality. Introduced at the March 1993 Geneva Salon - albeit deliveries did not start until late the following year - the newcomer had been subjected to more testing and development work than any of the marque's previous models. Indeed under the watchful eye of Engineering Director Rod Mansfield Project NPX (as the nascent DB7 was labelled) got through some thirty prototypes. Based around a steel semi-monocoque chassis the production version was equipped with all-round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and power assisted rack and pinion steering. Derived from a proven Jaguar unit, the DB7's 3239cc DOHC straight-six engine boasted four valves per cylinder, Zytec multi-point fuel injection and an Eaton supercharger. Credited with developing 335bhp and 360lbft, it was allied to five-speed manual transmission as standard and reputedly enabled the Aston Martin to sprint from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and reach 161mph. Styled by Ian Callum just 879 straight-six powered DB7 Volantes were reputedly made like the sale car including several limited edition models. Finished in Mendip Blue matched to a Cream leather interior with Blue piping, ‘M1 VTG’ has covered just 66,000 miles from new. Offered with copies of service history plus a collection of invoices the Aston also comes with 2 keys, tool kit and has recently been shod with new front tyres. The cherished registration number 'M1 VTG' is included in the sale. Said to have been maintained with no expense spared for the last 10 years, it is no surprise the vendor currently grades the DB7’s engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘excellent’. Offered with an MOT certificate into February 2022. 1998 Aston Martin DB7 Volante M1 VTG SCFAAWK202090 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £20,000 - £24,000

JEFF HARRIS: Presented in Metallic Silver with Metallic British Racing Green body stripe and features a complimentary black and green interior. Reportedly used by the Walkletts in their dealer adverts High specification car powered by a 2.0 Zetec engine and eligible for a number of championships Accompanied by a number of previous MOTs and invoices totaling over £26,000 The Ginetta Cars Company was created in 1958 by the four Walklett brothers, Bob, Ivor, Trevers, and Douglas. The Company was located in Woodbridge, Suffolk, England, and produced kit cars using primarily Ford components. By the early 1960s, the Ginetta company established a good name for itself. The Ginetta G3 was their first full-fendered vehicle and by 1960 the Walklett brothers launched what would become one of their most enduring and successful models – the Ginetta G4. By 1960, the Ginetta Cars Company would launch one of their most enduring and successful models – the Ginetta G4. The fourth model from the Ginetta Car Company, the G4, was a slight deviation from their prior products and was intended for both the road and track. It featured a multi-tubular space frame chassis construction with double wishbones, coil springs, and dampers in the front. A Ford live axle with upper trailing arms, coil springs and dampers made up the rear suspension. Drum brakes that measured eight inches, located in the front and back, kept the vehicle in the driver's control. The engine was a Ford 105E unit that produced nearly 40 horsepower, which could carry the car to speeds of about 100 mph. The engine did not produce much power, but much like the rest of the vehicle employed lightweight construction. Over the proceeding eight years, many improvements were made to the G4, including various engine options being offered, a Coupe version becoming available, a BMC rear axle which replaced the Ford live axle, disc brakes which greatly improved the car's performance and much more. By this time, the Ginetta G4 was proving a front-runner at the national level, with multiple class wins against cars of great significance. One account by John Burton is noted: “We had quite a lot of success with the G4 but I suppose some of the most memorable races were at Castle Combe where we used to have great battles with Ron Fry’s Ferrari 250LM; real David and Goliath tussles. The crowds used to enjoy seeing our little red car going up against the mightily powerful Ferrari and, although we never beat him, we got quite close!’’. Following the sale of the original Ginetta company, the Walklett brothers under Dare (UK) negotiated a license to produce the Ginetta G4 and G12 and the well-respected Essex-based company are still in business today fabricating shells and an extensive number of parts. One of the aforementioned Dare cars reportedly built by the Walkletts themselves, XPF 162 was manufactured in 1998 and is presented in Metallic Silver with Metallic British Racing Green body stripe and features a complimentary black and green interior. As designed, this particular example is a relatively rare convertible offered with both hard and soft tops and was built as a competition car that is equally useable on the road and is therefore fully road legal, whilst still being eligible for a number of championships, notably the Sports Specials Championship within 750MC, Ginetta's own series, Classic & Sports Car Club Modern Classics is also an option as well as HSCC's Historic Road Sports (with some minor modification perhaps). It may also be possible to apply for a historic passport with a replacement engine. XPF 162 is thought to be the only car powered by a 2.0 Zetec and is described as an ‘animal’ by the vendor, with the most recent Dyno printout showing 220bhp. Additional specification includes a dry-sump with catch tank and Titan oil pump kit, Alloy ‘Radtec’ radiator, 4-1 exhaust into BTB noise-compliant stainless side exit box (pre-SVA, so no cat). As well as this, the car features an Omex 600 ECU and loom, Ford Type 9 gearbox with semi-helical 5-speed close-ratio, rear Sierra LSD with uprated driveshafts, uprated adjustable dampers with bespoke Brembo/Dare front four-pot calipers and brake bias adjuster, DARE chrome rollover bars and Toyo R888 semi-slick tyres. XPF 162 was subject to restoration in 2010 which included a full engine overhaul at a cost of some £7,000 and comes accompanied by a number of previous MOTs and invoices totaling over £26,000. The odometer displays 32,981 miles and the V5 document shows 4 former keepers. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork and paintwork as ‘Good’, with the engine, electrical equipment, transmission and gearbox, and interior trim as ‘Very Good,' and the car is offered with an MOT valid until 18 August 2022. 1998 Dare Ginetta G4 XPF 162 SABTVR03598219120 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £26,000 - £30,000

1999 (1989) Royale Sabre G942 BBM RS1297021 h&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £15,000

JEFF HARRIS: 1 of 439 first-series, RHD example made and first registered as '8 AC' Four former keepers and current ownership since 2017 Serviced by a specialist Rolls-Royce engineer and said to possess 'all books and history' Finished in Black with Stone leather upholstery and Dark Blue carpets, this particular example is described by the vendor as being in ‘very good overall’ condition with regards to its turbocharged 4.4 litre V8 engine, automatic transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork. First road registered as ‘8 AC’, the Bentley has covered some 53,000 miles from new. Sparingly used since entering the current ownership during 2017, the Arnage is said to have been ‘serviced by a specialist Rolls-Royce engineer’. Riding on correct type alloys, this imposing luxury saloon is offered for sale with book pack, history and MOT certificate valid until February 2022. Like its predecessor the Mulsanne, the Arnage was named after a section of the famous La Sarthe circuit at which Bentley had scored five Le Mans 24-hours victories during the 1920s. Based around a moncoque bodyshell equipped with all round independent suspension, four-wheel disc brakes and power assisted steering, the newcomer was powered by a BMW-derived twin-turbocharged 4.4 litre V8 engine allied to five-speed automatic transmission. With some 350bhp and 420lbft of torque on tap, the luxury saloon was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 6.5 seconds and 149mph. As befitted a Crewe built car, its interior was beautifully trimmed with the best quality leather and wood veneers. Reworked to accept Bentley’s venerable 6.75 litre V8 following Volkswagen’s takeover of Bentley in 1999, the number of BMW-powered Arnages was rather small with a mere 439 first series RHD examples being made. 1999 Bentley Arnage V436 EPN SCBLB51E2XCH02639 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £15,000 - £17,000

JEFF HARRIS: Returning to the very venue it was purchased from through H&H Classics in June of 2019, NSU 501 is presented in Silver Tempest with contrasting Ascot leather interior with cedar carpets In June 2021 benefited from a full service at Bentley specialists Silverlady including a replacement radiator and brake pipes at a cost of £2,169. Cost a staggering £155,000 when new, and now offered at less than 10% of its original price. The Arnage was phased in during the spring of 1998, initially with BMW power. However, Bentley then passed into the hands of the Volkswagen Group while Rolls-Royce was acquired by BMW, forcing Volkswagen to find an alternative engine for the Arnage. In fact they sourced two, creating the option of Red and Green Label models, with the Red Label featuring a Cosworth-built version of Bentley's stalwart single-turbo OHV 6.75-litre V8, complete with a stump-pulling 616 lb ft of torque. Returning to the very venue it was purchased from, through H&H Classics in June of 2019, NSU 501 is presented in Silver Tempest with contrasting Ascot leather interior with cedar carpets and is offered with a suitably comprehensive specification including GPS navigation system, an Alpine CD Changer/radio, Park distance control, special MPH/KPH speedometer, footrests, lambswool over-rugs, rear picnic tables and more. In June 2021, NSU 501 benefited from a full service at Bentley specialists Silverlady including a replacement radiator and brake pipes at a cost of £2,169. The vehicle comes accompanied with a folder including the original bookpacks, a collection of previous MOTs, invoices totalling over £13,500, the V5 document which displays just 5 former keepers, the full specification sheet and more. The odometer currently displays some 99,000 miles and the registration ‘NSU 501’ is also included as part of the sale. The vendor rates the condition of the bodywork, engine, electrical equipment, paintwork, transmission and interior trim all as ‘Very Good. Costing a staggering £155,000 when new, NSU 501 presents a fantastic opportunity to acquire a luxury Bentley at less than 10% of its original price. 1999 Bentley Arnage Red Label NSU 501 SCBLC32ECH04154 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

JEFF HARRIS: Just 646 miles from new and low ownership Supplied new by Blue Bell BMW of Crewe Offered with book pack, handbooks and service book ‘T235KAP’ represents a rare opportunity to acquire an extremely low mileage example of the iconic Z3M Coupe as the car offered today has covered just 646 miles from new in the hands of the vendor and three former keepers (the first two recorded keepers being of the same family). Supplied new by Blue Bell BMW of Crewe, it has been with the vendor since 2016 and was last serviced in 2019. Finished in Arctic Silver and fitted with genuine AC Schnitzer pedals, it is offered with an original sales brochure, original book pack with handbook and service book, two keys and a collection of old MoTs. We are informed this true collectors’ BMW will be freshly serviced in time for the sale and offered with a fresh MoT certificate. It is no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘excellent’. The M Coupé, manufactured from 1998 until 2002, was developed under the leadership of engineer Burkhard Göschel with the intention of adding increased torsional and structural rigidity to the Z3 roadster's chassis. The development team initially struggled to get the Board of Directors at BMW to approve the model for production, but it was eventually given the thumbs up so long as it remained cost-effective to produce. To help achieve this, the majority of the body panels needed to be shared with the M roadster, thus the doors and everything from the A-pillar forward are interchangeable between the coupe and roadster, as are most of the interior parts. The Z3 coupe, which combined the M coupe's body with the standard Z3 drivetrain, chassis and cosmetics was also approved for production at the same time. Production of the M Series cars commenced in 1998 at BMW’s Spartanburg plant in Greer, South Carolina, USA, with some of the major components such as engines and transmissions being imported from Germany. Up until the 2001 model year the Z3M Coupe and Roadster were powered by the same engine to be found in the E36 M3. Most countries initially receiving cars with the 3.2-litre version of the BMW S50 engine, while for the North American market the less powerful BMW S52 engine was utilised. The S50 developed some 316 hp at 7,400 rpm and 260 lb ft torque at 3,250rpm, a run of 2,999 cars being produced with this unit. As with the Z3 model, the M Coupe’s suspension features MacPherson struts at the front and semi-trailing arms to the rear. Compared to standard cars, however, the M series included modifications such as wider front and rear track, reduced ride height, modified front suspension geometry, firmer springs and shock absorbers, thicker anti-roll bars, stronger semi-trailing arms together with a reinforced subframe. The brakes from the E36 M3 were also carried over, these being vented discs measuring 315.0 mm on the front and 312.4 mm on the rear. In most countries, the front discs were a two-piece ‘floating rotor’ design. Power was transmitted via a ZF Type C 5-speed manual gearbox whilst a limited slip differential with a maximum locking of 25 percent was fitted as standard. With its semi-retro looks and high performance the Z3M Coupe offered a useful level of practicality over its Roadster sibling making it, in our opinion, the model of choice for enthusiasts. 1999 BMW M Coupe T235 KAP WBSCM92090LB29268 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £70,000 - £90,000

2000 Range Rover Vogue 4.6 X534 CBL SALLPAMJ31A446157 H&H 8th Sept 2021 No Reserve

JEFF HARRIS: Just 1 private keeper and 35,200 miles from new Original book pack, handbook and service book with 16 Bentley stamps Offered with a collection of invoices and old MOT's Originally supplied by Broughtons of Cheltenham, this low mileage Red Label has benefited from having just one private keeper from new and has covered just c.35,200 miles in his ownership. Finished attractively in Black Emerald with Cotswold leather interior piped in Spruce Green ‘Y969RDF’ has been freshly serviced in August 2021 by Bentley Cambridge which included an oil filter change, brake fluid and coolant flush. Offered with its original book pack, handbooks and service book with sixteen stamps, all by Bentley, together with two keys and a large collection of invoices relating to its service history, this fine example is most definitely a cut above the usual offerings. It’s no surprise the vendor currently grades the engine, transmission, electrical equipment, interior trim, bodywork and paintwork all as ‘very good’ and is offered with an MOT certificate into February 2022. Introduced at the 1999 Frankfurt Motor Show, the Bentley Arnage Red Label boasted 835Nm of torque - more than any other production car! Powered by a revised version of the marque's long-serving 6.75-litre V8 (albeit in turbocharged guise) allied to four-speed automatic transmission, the newcomer was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 5.9 seconds and 155mph. Further benefiting from a stiffer bodyshell, revised suspension and bigger brakes, the luxury sports saloon came with an Alpine sat-nav system and parking sensors as standard. A tangible link to the Crewe-built Bentleys of the 1950s/60s, the last of 2,282 Red Labels was completed in 2005. 2001 Bentley Arnage Red Label Y96 9 RDF SCBLC31E11CH06142 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £22,000 - £26,000

JEFF HARRIS: Just 47,600 miles and 4 former keepers from new Offered with book pack, handbook and service book Offered with a collection of invoices and old MOT's This silver with black interior Arnage currently registers just 47,600 miles on its odometer which have been covered in the hands of four former keepers from new. It features the optional brushed aluminium dashboard with Diamond stitched seats and benefits from repainting of the front and rear bumpers at a cost of £2308 in 2021. The air-conditioning has also recently been re-gassed. Offered with its book pack including handbook and service book first stamped by Bentley and a collection of invoices and old MoTs, the vendor currently rates the bodywork, paintwork, interior, engine plus transmission as all being in “very good” condition and is offered with an MOT into October 2021. The Bentley Arnage and its Rolls-Royce sibling, the Silver Seraph, were phased in during the Spring of 1998 as replacements for derivatives of the long-serving Mulsanne (Bentley) and Silver Spirit (Rolls-Royce). The bodies for the new cars were built at the Bentley factory in Crewe. The Arnage T was heralded as the most powerful model in the Bentley range at its 2002 North American International Auto Show launch. As with the Arnage R, there were twin turbochargers, but tuned to develop 465 metric horsepower (342 kW; 459 bhp) and 875 newton metres (645lbft). The Arnage T was reputedly capable of 0-60 mph in 5.5 seconds and 170mph. 2002 Bentley Arnage T DG52 KPP SC8LF34F63CH09116 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £20,000 - £25,000

2002 Mercedes-Benz SL55 AMG T.B.A. WDB2304742F029491 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £25,000 - £30,000

JEFF HARRIS: Introduced at the September 2001 Frankfurt Motor Show, the R230-series of Mercedes-Benz’s long-running SL range remained in production for ten years. Arguably the most accomplished two-seater Grand Tourer of its generation, the newcomer offered a blend of performance, ride, handling and refinement that few, if any, rivals could match. The initial flagship before the arrival of the AMG models, the SL500 was powered by a 5-litre V8 engine allied to five-speed automatic transmission. With some 302bhp / 339lbft of torque on tap, it was reputedly capable of 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds and 155mph. A one owner car that has covered just 6,500 miles from new, this decidedly smart SL 500 features Brilliant Silver metallic paintwork, Anthracite Black leather upholstery, Burr Walnut veneers, Active Body Control suspension, Xenon headlamps, COMAND, AMG 18-inch alloys and a multi-disc CD player. Rated by the vendor as ‘excellent’ with regards to its 5-litre V8 engine, five-speed automatic transmission, bodywork, paintwork, electrical equipment and interior trim, the Mercedes-Benz is only being offered for sale due to a house move. The retractable hardtop roof is understood to be in full working order and this classically liveried ‘Silver Arrow’ possesses a MOT certificate valid until September 2022. 2003 Mercedes-Benz SL 500 T.B.A WDB2304752F040642 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £14,000 - £16,000

JEFF HARRIS: Finished in Metallic Silver with Red leather interior and Red carpets 74,900 miles from new and fitted with Manual transmission Offered with Maserati handbook and service book with 15 service stamps Freshly serviced and shod with two new Pirelli P Zero tyres Unveiled at the 2002 Detroit Show, the 177mph Maserati Coupe (a.k.a. 4200 GT) was styled by Giorgetto Giugiaro of Italdesign. Developing 385bhp/332lbft, its 4244cc V8 engine was allied to a six-speed transmission that could be had in conventional manual or 'Cambiocorsa' guises (the latter incorporating electrohydraulic assistance and F1-style steering wheel paddles). Supplied new by Stratstone of Wilmslow this handsome righthand drive manual example is finished in Metallic silver, trimmed with a luxurious Red leather interior and Red carpets. Riding on 18-inch seven-spoke alloy wheels other cosmetic highlights include Rosso Red-coloured brake calipers and the comprehensive specification includes Maserati Stability Program (MSP) and electrically-controlled front seats. Displaying 74,950 miles 'MX03 TGY' is now offered complete with its original Maserati tool kit, book pack with handbook and service book with 15 entries plus a collection of invoices and old MOT certificates. Freshly serviced and shod with two new Pirelli P Zero tyres the vendor considers the Coupe's Ferrari-based V8 engine, manual transmission, bodywork, paintwork and interior trim to be in `very good' order and is offering the Maserati with an MOT certificate into March 2022, surely amazing value in today's market. 2004 Maserati 4200 GT MX53 TGY ZAMEC38C000015885 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £12,000 - £14,000

2005 BMW M6 PK55 XAZ WBSEH92000CG99141 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £8,000 - £10,000

2006 Bentley Arnage Diamond Series DK56 HYA SCBLC37F66CH11554 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £16,000 - £18,000

2007 Piaggio APE TM Tricycle Tipper NX07 EFJ ZAPT1000000031438 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £7,280
2008 Bentley Continental GT Speed YJ58 CXY SCBCF63W58C058102 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £28,000 - £32,000

2020 Realm Heritage C-Type JFZ 669 REALMXKC120052519 H&H 8th Sept 2021 £40,000 - £50,000

1965 Jaguar S-Type 3.8 CSA 888C 1B54494DN Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £10,754
1996 TVR Chimaera Clubman (4.0 litre) P360 DEP SDLDCC485TJ012033 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £32,480
1968 Ford Capri 1.6 GT Mk. I EHJ 870H KB89482 Historics 17th July 2021 £12,000 - £16,000 £13,440
1967 Volkswagen Beach Buggy JRU 724E 117476784 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £5,600
1930 Ford Model A VE 3109 AF2957933 Historics 17th July 2021 No Reserve £9,724



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